Month: June 2017

Sunday’s Obituary – Philip Melville Cardell (1917-1940)

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Philip Melville Cardell is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are Harold Stanley Cardell and Elsie Louise Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley, my 3x great grandparents. Philip is on the right in the above photograph

I wrote about Philip in Military Monday back in January 2012.

I have now found a report of his death in the Biggleswade Chronicle on 11 October 1940.

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P/O P CARDELL KILLED

Pilot-Officer Philip Cardell, elder son of Mr and Mrs H S Cardell, Paxton Manor, St. Neots, has been killed while on active service.

Pilot-Officer Philip Cardell had taken part in a number of air battles and accounted for a number of German aircraft. In his last battle he had just shot down an enemy plane when his plane was seriously damaged. Both he and his companion baled out. Mr Cardell fell into the sea, his companion landed safely. After the rescue, attempts at artificial respiration were made, but without success.

Philip Cardell, who was 23, was a general favourite. He was always cheerful, bright, energetic and kind. He was educated at Paxton Park. After leaving school he joined his father and became a very efficient and capable farmer, with an excellent knowledge of both the practical and scientific sides of the industry. He thoroughly enjoyed various kinds of sport; hockey, badminton, golf and lawn tennis in particular. Some time before the war started he and his brother entered the RAF Vol. Reserve for preliminary training.

Mr Cardell was a Society Steward at St. Neots Methodist Church.

The funeral was at Great Paxton Thursday week.

Philip had made a will, presumably before starting his RAF service. You can see from the image below that he left £432 6s 8d to his parents Harold Stanley Cardell and Elsie Louise Cardell.

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Grave Search at Rylstone, North Yorkshire

A day out in the Yorkshire Dales today looking for the gravestone of my 2x great grandparents James Paley and Mary Ann Paley (nee Spink).

I knew that they were buried at St Peter’s church in Rylstone, North Yorkshire, about seven miles north of Skipton.

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So we set off this morning under grey clouds and rain. It’s only about an hour or so from our home and by the time we got there the weather had improved – although we got wet feet tramping through the grass in the grave yard.

Anyway we found the grave and I will post a blog story and photo’s next week.

St Peter’s was built in 1852-1853 to a design by the Lancaster architect E G Paley (as far as I can tell he is no relation to my Paley’s) replacing an earlier church on the site. Its total cost was £1700 (equivalent to £160,000 in 2015).

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The church is a Grade II Listed Building and is an active Anglican church in the deanery of Skipton, the archdeaconry of Craven and the diocese of Bradford.

The churchyard contains four war graves, of a Yorkshire Regiment officer and Royal Navy seaman of the First World War and a Royal Artillery soldier and airman of the Second World War. We didn’t see those graves today so I think another visit is required.

Note the obligatory grazing sheep in our rural churchyards.

Travel Tuesday – Luther Espley (1915-1989)

Travel Tuesday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Do you have images, quotes or stories about trips your ancestors or family took during their lives? Or have to ventured out on travels to your ancestral homeland as part of your genealogy research?

Luther Espley is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. He was born on 20 April 1915 in Burnley, Lancashire, to parents John Espley and Sarah Booth.

Luther married Edna Adelaide Currin in Burnley on 11 May 1940 and they had one son, John in 1945.

The family decided to emigrate to Los Angeles, California, in 1947 – following in the footsteps of Luther’s step-sister Jenny Booth.

Luther passed away on 11 January 1989, and Edna on 1 August 1993, both in Los Angeles.

I have just come across the following article from the Burnley Express of 8 March 1947 about their impending departure.

Burnley Express - 8 March 1947.pngGoing Where The Sun Will Shine

To seek sunshine, a better standard of living and better prospects for the future, Mr Luther Espley, his wife, Mrs Edna Espley, and their 19-months-old son, John, will leave England in three weeks’ time for California, where they will live near Los Angeles.

Mrs Espley and the baby leave this week-end for Liverpool, and the family will sail from Southampton in ss America on March 28th. In America they will join Mr Espley’s sister, who went to live there 22 years ago. Now Mrs Jeny Holden, she was well known in Burnley as a tailoress in Briercliffe Road, where she took a shop after having been employed at Primrose Bank Institution. In Burnley she will be remembered as Jenny Booth. Mrs Holden, who came to Burnley on a visit 10 years ago, is connected with the Lancashire Society of Los Angeles.

Mr Espley is at present employed in the Water Department testing office. He joined the department on leaving school. Being a local Territorial he was called up with the 52nd LAA Regiment, RA, on the outbreak of war, and served in France, being evacuated at Dunkirk. Later he served with the Eighth Army throughout the desert campaign, and was released from the Forces in December, 1945.

“During my travels,” he says, “I was attached to the American Fifth Army in Italy for a long time, and their descriptions of life in America fitted in with what I am looking for. We are going because we think living conditions are better there, and there will be better opportunities and prospects, especially for the youngster. And there’s plenty of sunshine all the year round.”

I have lots of admiration for Luther, Edna and John, especially for their adventurous spirit. I hope that they enjoyed their new life in California.

Black Sheep Sunday – Sarah Dawson (nee Hopkinson) – Part 2

Four months have passed since the troubles reported in the Burnley Express on 18  August 1886. But it seems as though things came to a head again before the end of August. See part one here.

Part two of the feud between the Quinn’s and the Dawson’s in Barrowford, Lancashire, was reported in the Burnley Express of 18 December 1886

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COLNE COUNTY COURT

Monday – Before his honour Judge Gates QC

A QUARREL BETWEEN NEIGHBOURS. Charlotte Quinn, weaver, of the Park, Barrowford, sued John Dawson, Barrowford, for £12, damages for an assault committed upon her by defendant’s wife Sarah Dawson. Mr Robinson, Keighley, appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr J Sutcliffe represented the defendants. Mr Robinson stated that upon the 31 August John Dawson was in the house of the mother of the plaintiff. Mrs Dawson appeared to object to him staying there, and she went to fetch him out. He went out and some disturbance took place in the street between Mrs Dawson and one of the plaintiff’s sisters. Plaintiff heard a noise and she went out of the house to ascertain the cause, but she took no part in the bother. She had been standing on the door steps a minute when Mrs Dawson rushed into the house and brought out a large four-legged wooden stool, which she threw and hit her a violent blow upon the side of her face. She was rendered insensible by the injuries, in consequence of which she had been very ill for over a fortnight. The damages were for loss of work, doctors’ bills etc. Mr Sutcliffe stated that the row arose in consequence of the Quinns harbouring Mrs Dawson’s husband. He admitted that Mrs Dawson had thrown the stool, but it did not strike the plaintiff who stumbled and fell over a parapet. His honour said the only question to decide was whether the stool thrown by the defendant struck the plaintiff or not, and upon that he did not think there could be any doubt. He would therefore give a verdict for £5 5s.

So ended an “Annus Horribilis” for John and Sarah – which started badly with John’s accident at work back in February.

As far as I know there were no other incidents involving the Dawson family and the Quinn family – at least none that I can find in  the newspaper archives!!

Genealogy News

I thought I would try a bit harder to keep up to date with what’s happening in the genealogy world outside my own blog. So in an effort to do this I just did a simple “genealogy news” search on Google.

One of the first hits I got was blog by Amy Johnson Crow asking the question Is Genealogy Blogging Dead? This is certainly an interesting read and looks at blogging alongside the rise of social media platforms like Facebook.

I have to say I haven’t yet embraced or more accurately combined my blogging with social media. True, I do share my regular blogs on my personal Facebook page but these are lost among the many other posts that appear there.

One blog I read that has recently undergone a makeover is My Descendants Ancestors  and I know that Elizabeth, who owns the blog, also has a dedicated Facebook page and Twitter page. And I’m sure that must help with her blog’s profile and traffic.

Seeing what Elizabeth does has inspired me to try to get to grips a bit more and see what I can do to improve the traffic to my blog. I generally just blog about my own family and my wife’s family – so perhaps my audience is not that great anyway. However I have made connections from distant family members who have discovered my blog and are now “followers”.

I blog because I want to record and tell my family stories – I’m doing it for me and if others find it interesting that’s just great.

Here are some other bits of genealogy news that you might find interesting:-

Ancestry.com denies exploiting users DNA – BBC News

Abandoned baby finds family after 60 years – BBC News

Hero’s First World War medal reunited with family…99 years after his death – Dorset Echo

Black Sheep Sunday – Sarah Dawson (nee Hopkinson) – Part 1

John Dawson is my 1st cousin 4x removed. His parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Benson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

John married Sarah Hopkinson sometime in the Summer of 1857 – the marriage was registered in Q3 at Skipton, Yorkshire.

posted last week about John being injured working as an “engine tenter” in February 1886 and whet your appetite for more posts.

Some six months later in the Summer of 1886 it seems as though there was a bit of marital and neighbour disharmony as reported in the Burnley Express of 11 August 1886.

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Sarah Quinn, of Barrowford, was summoned for assaulting Sarah Dawson, wife of John Dawson, of Barrowford. There was a cross summons charging Dawson with assaulting Quinn. Mr Robinson appeared for Quinn, and Mr M Stuttard represented Dawson. Mrs Dawson stated that on the 31st ult. she saw her husband coming up the street in drink. He went to Quinn’s house, and she followed, and asked him to go home, but he refused. Mrs Quinn, sen., and her daughters followed her home, and defendant hit her on the eye, and pushed the door in her face. By Mr Robinson: She did not strike her husband. She did not call Sarah Quinn a foul name, nor slap her face. She threw a stool in self defence at the family, but it did not strike either of them. Elizabeth Smith spoke to seeing the Quinn family surrounding Mrs Dawson’s house, and saw Sarah Quinn strike Mrs Dawson on the face. She did not see the stool strike any of the girls. Both cases were dismissed.

Perhaps a satisfactory end to a domestic dispute you might be forgiven for thinking. However this is not the last you will hear about “the stool”. Part two of the saga continues next week.

Workday Wednesday – John Dawson (Engine Tenter)

Workday Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Here’s a way to document your ancestors’ occupations (they weren’t all farmers), transcripts of SS-5s, photos and stories of ancestors at work, announcements of retirements, etc.

John Dawson is my 1st cousin 4x removed. His parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Benson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

John married Sarah Hopkinson sometime in the Summer of 1857. The marriage is registered in Q3 at Skipton, Yorkshire.

John’s main occupation as described in the census returns for 1871, 1881 and 1891 is “engine tenter”. I have mentioned John in an earlier post here.  He followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather (my 4x great grandfather – John Dawson) of looking after the machines and engines at Ickornshaw Mill in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

I must admit I hadn’t given much thought to how difficult and dangerous the job of “engine tenter” might be – that is until I came across the following article from the Burnley Express of 6 March 1886.

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ACCIDENT – On Friday week, John Dawson, engine-tenter, Barrowford, met with an accident. He and three or four other workmen were fixing a new beam-key in the engine-house at Mr Barrowclough’s mill, when suddenly the jenny chain which had been used for raising the beam broke, and the beam fell with a force of over ten tons on Dawson’s left hand, cutting off two fingers, and holding the man fast with the long finger, which had subsequently to be amputated. The accident happened in the chamber of the engine shed, and Dawson, realising his position, kept from falling below. A new chain was procured, and Dawson was released. The hand has been dressed by Dr Pim.

As it turned out 1886 would continue to be a difficult year for John – he appears in the next two instalments of Black Sheep Sunday together with his wife Sarah.