wedding

Christmas Eve Weddings

Happy Christmas 2012 to all my blog followers and readers.

I thought I would just have a look and see what family events have taken place on Christmas Eve in the past.  I discovered at least three weddings within a seven year period between 1859 and 1866.

Benjamin Gawthrop & Elizabeth Eastwood

Benjamin is my 2nd great grand uncle and he married Elizabeth Eastwood in 1859. According to the record in Ancestry they were both 21 years old. The marriage is registered in Colne, Lancashire. The grooms father was Martin Gawthrop (my 3x great grandfather) and the brides father was Richard Eastwood.

Benjamin and Ann had at least two children – Ann and Benjamin.

Ellen Carradice & Robert Brockbank

Ellen is my 2nd great grand aunt and she married Robert Brockbank in 1864. According to the marriage certificate they were both 24 years old. The marriage took place at Kendal parish church in Westmorland. The grooms father was Samuel Brockbank – a woollen spinner and the brides father was John Carradice (my 3x great grandfather) who was a weaver.

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Margaret Dawson & Abel Ellison

Margaret is my 2nd great grand aunt and she married Abel Ellison in 1866. Abel was about 28 years old and Margaret one year younger. The marriage took place at St. Andrew’s church in Kildwick, West Yorkshire. The brides father was Thomas Dawson (my 3x great grandfather).

What a magical time to be getting married. I hope they all had wonderful celebrations.

Wedding Wednesday – Flapper Girl?

I found this photograph in a tin I brought from my mum and dad. There are loads of photographs – some old and others more recent. I know some of the people, can guess at a few of the others and have no idea about the majority.

I have on my “to do” list getting my mum to go through the photographs and trying to put more names to faces.

Anyway, this particular photograph falls in to the category of “I have no idea who they are”.

I thought that I had struck lucky when I turned the photograph over and saw an inscription on the back. Then I read “This is us leaving the church after the wedding” – well I think I could have made quite a good stab at that myself. I just wanted to shout why didn’t you sign it “with love ….” or something.

I am guessing that the period is sometime in the 1920’s. Is the bride’s dress and head ware a bit “flapperish”? It looks like it to me.

So, whoever you are I hope you enjoyed your wedding day and had a happy life together. I might find out more about you in the future.

Wedding Wednesday – Wartime Hitch

My Parents married on 4th January 1941 at St James Church in Grimsby Lincolnshire. Grimsby was my mother’s home town but at some point she moved about 30 miles away to Sutton-on-Sea on the Lincolnshire coast to help my dad run a little glass and china business. My brother married in the same church 30 years later because, coincidentally, he married a Grimsby girl.
  
 
Both my parents had unusual surnames. Mum was a Britliffe – more commonly spelt with a ’c’ as in Britcliffe and Dad’s name was Espley. They also both had shortened versions of first names – Dad was Fred rather than Fredrick and mum was Bessie which is usually given to girls christened as Elizabeth.  
 

I’m not sure how my parents met. Both are now dead so I can’t ask. My Dad died in 1977 before I took any interest in their history and I never had the sort of relationship with my mum that lead to any discussion about ‘the old days’. In her later years when Mike started to research our family history she had great difficulty understanding why we would want to do such a thing.

Anyway I think my father must have been stationed in Grimsby during the war. He had a bout of polio when he was small and was deaf in one ear so wasn’t sent overseas. Certainly at some point dad was moved to Pontefract, West Yorkshire, because I know mum visited him at the barracks there. I am not sure if this was before or after the wedding.

Dad was nine years older than mum. Her dad was suspicious of this and told her that Fred was probably already married with kids. Mum disliked her dad and he didn’t attend the wedding. I am not sure whether he was working, he simply chose not to go or mum asked him not to attend.

My Uncle Jack – Mum’s brother- second from the right in the photo, gave her away. Dad’s Best Man was his brother Frank. The smallest two Bridesmaids are my cousins Shirley and Tessa but I don’t know the identities of anyone else in the photo.

The dresses were all made of velvet which must have been fabulous for a winter wedding. I am not sure how they got hold of all this fabric during the war. I believe the small Bridesmaids were in lilac and perhaps, therefore, the grown up attendants were in purple. The two colours would seem to go together.

The other thing I know is that mum had asked dad to buy a suit as she didn’t want him to get married in his army uniform. Obviously he ignored her! Luckily it didn’t make her change her mind and they were happily married for 36 years.

Jayne