St. Peter’s

Markby – Postcard #10

This is a postcard of St. Peter’s church at Markby in Lincolnshire.  The church has no family significance at all – I just really like it so I bought the postcard.

The postcard is unused and is part of the “celesque series” published by The Photochrom Co Ltd.

St. Peter’s is one of the few remaining thatched churches in the UK and the only one in Lincolnshire.  Here is an article from The Telegraph written in August 2007 about “The surprise of thatched churches”.

Markby village is situated 3½ miles from Alford and consists of about two dozen properties. The church stands on the site of an old Augustinian Priory, and in fact is partly built of stone rescued from the priory ruins.

After the founding of the priory in 1160, the local people were encouraged by the Canons to use the Priory Church.  On the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII they obtained permission, first to use a comer of the old priory and then in 1611 to build the present church.  In the first instance the roof was tiled, but in 1672 Richard White, churchwarden, substituted a thatch, taking the tiles as payment.

By the late 19th Century St. Peter’s was in a sorry state and incapable of being used regularly so a new corrugated iron church, “Christ Church”, was erected near by – the old church being retained for funerals and the occasional wedding.  However by 1962 this “tin church” was rusting and irreparable so it was decided to renovate old St. Peter’s.

Today the interior of the church still bears traces of its history – the Norman dog-toothed decoration on the chancel arch, the former oak cross beam rescued from the roof bearing a date of 1611, together with the ancient font from the old parish church, the 13th Century rose sculpture and the 19th Century box pews.  More photo’s here.

The thatched roof was replaced in 2008.

Addingham – Postcard #5

This is a postcard of St. Peter’s church in Addingham, West Yorkshire. The card is unused and the condition is not very good. In fact I would go so far as to say that all is not as it seems at first glance.

The front of the postcard says that it is published by the Skipton Stationery Co. The back of the card appears to be from something else all together. There is an inscription which says – No 4046 published by Portland Post Card Co., Portland, Ore. and Seattle, Wash. (Made in Germany).

The Portland Post Card Co. (1908-1916) published many scenes from the American west coast including Alaska. They were the official publisher of postcards for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in 1909. But I doubt very much that they ever published a postcard of St. Peter’s church, Addingham.

I haven’t yet been able to find an image of Portland Post Card No. 4046. If anyone else happens to spot one I would be interested to have a look.

So then I have a postcard that is almost certainly not in its original state. Nevertheless I got it for the picture of the church so it adequately meets that requirement.

St. Peters, Addingham has its own website with lots of history about Christian worship on the site in three millennia dating back to the 9th century.

My interest in Addingham is that it is the birth place of my 2x great grandfather, John Stowell (1828-1885) and some of his siblings. They didn’t stay there very long and certainly by the time of the 1851 census they had moved across the Pennines to Burnley in Lancashire.

I haven’t yet been to the records office to look for the baptism’s of my Stowell ancestors but I am guessing that they were probably baptised at St. Peter’s.