Kendal

Military Monday – Robert Alexander Carradice (1890-1919)

Robert Alexander Carradice is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Alexander Carradice and Adela Ormande Birkhead. Our common ancestor are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

Robert was born in Kendal, Westmorland in 1890, his birth is registered in Q3.

There are no military records available for Robert either at http://www.ancestry.co.uk or http://www.findmypast.co.uk. However there is reference to him on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website at http://www.cwgc.org and on http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk.

I know that Robert was a Sapper with the Royal Engineers and his service number was WR/327227.

Royal Engineers Badge

Royal Engineers Badge

The available information also says that Robert died on 8 February 1919.

So I have no information about his war time service or what lead up to his death. I can only surmise that he died at home. His death is recorded in the England & Wales registers and there is a gravestone for him in Kendal Parkside Cemetery.

Robert Alexander Carradice - Kendal Parkside Cemetery

Robert Alexander Carradice – Kendal Parkside Cemetery

Christmas Eve Weddings

Happy Christmas 2012 to all my blog followers and readers.

I thought I would just have a look and see what family events have taken place on Christmas Eve in the past.  I discovered at least three weddings within a seven year period between 1859 and 1866.

Benjamin Gawthrop & Elizabeth Eastwood

Benjamin is my 2nd great grand uncle and he married Elizabeth Eastwood in 1859. According to the record in Ancestry they were both 21 years old. The marriage is registered in Colne, Lancashire. The grooms father was Martin Gawthrop (my 3x great grandfather) and the brides father was Richard Eastwood.

Benjamin and Ann had at least two children – Ann and Benjamin.

Ellen Carradice & Robert Brockbank

Ellen is my 2nd great grand aunt and she married Robert Brockbank in 1864. According to the marriage certificate they were both 24 years old. The marriage took place at Kendal parish church in Westmorland. The grooms father was Samuel Brockbank – a woollen spinner and the brides father was John Carradice (my 3x great grandfather) who was a weaver.

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Margaret Dawson & Abel Ellison

Margaret is my 2nd great grand aunt and she married Abel Ellison in 1866. Abel was about 28 years old and Margaret one year younger. The marriage took place at St. Andrew’s church in Kildwick, West Yorkshire. The brides father was Thomas Dawson (my 3x great grandfather).

What a magical time to be getting married. I hope they all had wonderful celebrations.

Military Monday – Herbert Carradice (1896-1935)

Herbert Mark Carradice is my 1st cousin 3x removed – our common ancestors are my 3x great grandparents John Carradice and Ann Ridley.  Herbert was born in Kendal, Westmorland, to parents Alexander Carradice and Adela Ormandy Birkhead.  His birth is registered in the December quarter of 1895.

I have been lucky enough to find his WW1 service records on www.ancestry.co.uk so I know that Herbert enlisted on 3 October 1916 at Carlisle, Cumberland.  His regimental service number is 242249 (or 4360) and he was assigned to the 4th Border Regiment.  His age is given as 20 years 10 months and his occupation is ‘tailor’.

Herbert’s ‘military history sheet’ shows that he was at home from 3 October 1916 to 14 January 1917.  He embarked for Boulogne on 15 January 1917.

The next piece of information shows that Herbert was wounded in action on 3 July 1917 and was moved to Etaples Military Hospital.  He presumably recovered well enough from his injuries and rejoined his battalion on 2 September 1917.

As Christmas approached Herbert was granted leave from 24 December 1917 to 7 January 1918.

MISSING is stamped on his record on 10 April 1918.  Underneath that is a note dated 6 November 1918 that Herbert is a ‘prisoner of war’ but the location is unclear’.  Another document in his records shows that Herbert was captured on 21 March 1918 and interred in the town of Roisel.

On 10 December 1918 Herbert’s service record shows that he arrived back in England as a ‘repatriated prisoner of war’.

During Herbert’s time as a ‘prisoner of war’ his father, Alexander, was clearly anxious about his son.  On 14 April 1918, having not heard from Herbert for over a month Alexander wrote to the army asking for information.

On 18 May 1918 Alexander wrote again to the army sending on to them a postcard he had received from Herbert in Germany.  It seems that the army had asked Alexander to let them know if he had any contact from Herbert ‘so that his pay will not stop’.  Akexander asked for the postcard to be returned to him – I wonder if t ever was.

Alexander subsequently had a letter from Herbert and wrote to the Army Pay Office on 15 July 1918 asking if he was allowed to send a parcel to Herbert.

Herbert was finally ‘demobbed’ on 26 Novemeber 1919.  However, like many of his comrades he was retained in the Class Z Reserve.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918.  There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities.  Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z.  They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon.  The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Herbert married Hilda Marshall in Kendal, Westmorland sometime in the September quarter of 1927.  They had two children – Audrey in 1928 and Edwin in 1929.

Herbert died in 1935 – he was only 39.

Kendal – Postcard #13

Here is a postcard of Kendal Parish Church in Westmorland.

This is a real photograph published by Lilywhite Ltd. of Brighouse, West Yorkshire.  The postcard is unused and is in very good condition.

Kendal is a very important location in my family history.  It is the home of many ancestors on my nannie, Florrie Musgrove’s side of the family.  I can trace my Musgrove, Carradice, Turner, Rooking and a few other relatives to Kendal and the surrounding area.

Over the years my ancestors moved away from Westmorland and made the journey south to Lancashire and particularly Clitheroe.

Wedding Wednesday – John Carradice & Ann Ridley

My 3x great grandparents were married on this day in 1829 – sadly neither of them are still alive to celebrate the event.

John Carradice was born in Kendal in the county of Westmoreland about 1807 and Ann Ridley was born at Alston in Cumberland about 1810.

I found details of their marriage in the IGI but I haven’t yet been to the Records Office to check the information.  I was able to confirm Ann’s maiden name from my 2x great grandmother’s birth certificate – although deciphering the handwriting took quite a while.

Carradice is one of those names with a number of variants as well as deviants and the IGI records John’s name as Carradus.

I have no idea how the couple met and why they married in Kendal and not Alston for example.

John and Ann had thirteen children between 1831 and 1854.

William – c1829

John – c1831

Solomon – c1834

Mary – c1836

Thomas – c1838

Elizabeth – c1841

Ellen – c1842

Ann – c1844

David – c1846

Isaac – c1848

James – c1850

Alexander – c1852

Mary Jane – 8th November 1854 (my 2x great grandmother)

I found John and Ann in all the census returns between 1841 and 1871 – they remained in Kendal all the time.

In 1841 the Ancestry index had them as Carradine and in 1871 as Carradas.  A good example why genealogists need to be resourceful and use all their detective skills.

John was employed as a weaver all his working life.

Ann died about 1872 and John about 1873.

Other noteable events in 1829:-

Also on 2nd February Jonathan Martin set fire to York Minster

Andrew Jackson succeeded John Quincy Adams as the 7th President of the USA

Stephensons Rocket wins the Rainhill Trials

Oxford win the first University Boat Race

Surname Saturday – Carradice

The name Carradice is on my mother’s side of the family. The earliest ancestor with the name I have found is my is 3x great grandfather John Carradice. He was born in Kendal, Westmorland (United Kingdom) about 1807. There are potential candidates for his father in the records but I haven’t yet been able to determine the right person. This is a work in progress.

 According to surnamedb Carradice is an interesting and unusual name of Medieval Scottish origin. It is said to be a phonetic variant of the locational name Carruthers. This apparently comes from the parish of Middlebie, Dumfriesshire and pronounced in local speech as “Cridders”.

 Modern variants include – Crothers, Carrodus, Cardis, Cruddace and Caruth.

I rather like our family folklore interpretation which suggests that the name is of Italian origin and should be pronounced “Carradeechie”

Anyway, my John Carradice married Ann Ridley in Kendal on 2nd February 1829. They had at least 13 children. Their youngest child, Mary Jane is my 2x great grandmother. She was born 8th November 1854 – it’s her birthday in a couple of days, must remember to raise a glass in celebration. Mary Jane married Thomas Turner on 29th June 1872 at the Register Office in Kendal and she died on 18th April 1917 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I do not have any photographs of any of my Carradice ancestors but keep searching the Internet in the forlorn hope that one might turn up from a long lost relative somewhere.