Horton in Ribblesdale

Horton in Ribblesdale – Postcard #14

This is a postcard from my own collection.  It is a real photograph published by Joanes Publications, Broomhouse, George Nympton, South Molton, Devon.

The postcard is unused and in very good condition.

The image is of steam engine number 45522 ‘Prestatyn’ with a train from Carlisle at Horton in Ribblesdale station and is dated 27 July 1962.

If you’re a regular reader of my blog you might remember that Horton in Ribblesdale is an important location in my ancestry.  This is where my nannie, Florrie Musgrove, was born in 1897 – here’s a recent post about Foredale Cottages where she lived.

Horton in Ribblesdale railway station was built in 1876 during the construction of the 73 mile long stretch of line between Settle and Carlisle by the Midland Railway Company.  The line runs through remote regions of the Yorkshire Dales and the North Pennines, and is considered to be the most scenic railway in England.  The drama of its history and construction mean that it is regarded as one of the culminating symbols of Victorian enterprise and engineering.

All the station buildings along the route were designed by Midland Railway Company architect John Holloway Sanders.  The general design was known as Derby (or Midland) Gothic because the company was based in Derby.

There were three sizes of buildings in all, reflecting the relative importance of the station stops.  Horton in Ribblesdale was a Type C station.

In 1963, Beeching Report into the restructuring of British Rail recommended the withdrawal of all passenger services from the line.  Some smaller stations had closed in the 1950s.  The Beeching recommendations were shelved, but in May 1970 all stations except for Settle and Appleby were closed.

Over the next two decades the Settle – Carlisle line faced the threat of closure by British Rail as passenger number reduced and the cost of repairing viaducts and abandoned station buildings grew.  A very public campaign against the closure was eventually successful and the Government finally refused consent to close the line in 1989.

Meanwhile refurbishment work had already begun at Horton in Ribblesdale station and it was reopened in 1986.

There is one other family connection with this post.  The Midland Railway Company was merged into the London Midland & Scottish Railway, with the LNWR also forming part of the new company.  My granddad, Joseph Dawson, worked for LM&S, first as a fireman then a driver.  He’s the one in the photograph with a x on his arm.

Grandad Joe and his work mates

Florrie Musgrove – Happy Birthday

Florrie Musgrove is my maternal grandmother – or “nannie” as she was always known – and today is her birthday.  She was born on 6 January 1897 at Horton in Ribblesdale, Yorkshire.

Florrie was the third child of Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Musgrove (nee Turner).  She had nine siblings

John Robert Turner Musgrove (born c1892)

Thomas Musgrove (born c1894)

Mary Elizabeth Musgrove (born 1898)

James Musgrove (born 1901)

Joseph Musgrove (1903-1904)

Leah Musgrove (born c1905)

Isabel Musgrove (born c1906)

Alice Musgrove (born 1910)

Joseph Musgrove (born 1912)

When Florrie was born the family lived at Foredale Cottages just outside Horton in Ribblesdale.  These cottages were built for the workers of the local limestone quarry which is where Florrie’s dad worked.  Here’s a link to more information about the cottages.

Foredale Cottages

Foredale Cottages and Quarry

I mentioned the problems I had finding Florrie’s birth certificate when I talked about St. Catherine’s House, this is because it was registered under Florrie Mosgrove.

By the time of the 1901 census the family had moved to Clitheroe in Lancashire and were living at 50 Taylor Street.  Joseph is described as a limestone quarryman and had presumably moved to Clitheroe to find work in the local quarries.

In the 1911 census the family were living at 119 Lowergate, Clitheroe.  By now Florrie is 14 years old and she is working as a “ring spinner” in a cotton mill.

1911 Census

Some time during the next six years Florrie met and fell in love with Fred Musgrove, a local chap from Clitheroe.  They were married on 16 September 1917 at the United Methodist Church, Moor Lane Clitheroe.

Their marriage certificate also threw up another anomaly.  The father’s names have been written on the wrong lines – so Florries father is shown as Thomas instead of Joseph.  Yet another example and reminder of the importance of always checking and checking again the information from official records.

Witnesses at the wedding were Florrie’s brother John Robert Musgrove and Fred’s sister Ellen Halstead.

Over the next 18 years Florrie and Fred had eight children

Kathleen Musgrove (born 1918)

Thomas Musgrove (born 1920)

Joseph Harry Musgrove (born 1922)

Hazel Musgrove (born 1925)

Elizabeth Musgrove (born 1927)

Stowell Musgrove (born 1929)

Alice Musgrove (born 1930) – my mother

Mary Musgrove (born 1935)

My mum describes Florrie and Fred as very loving parents.  Both were hard working and fiercely loyal to their children.  Unfortunately Florrie suffered from bronchial asthma for many years so I am quite sure life must have been really hard.

Florrie died on 18 May 1971 at the age of 74 and is buried at Clitheroe Cemetery.