Fred and Florrie Musgrove

The street where they lived – Whalley Road, Clitheroe

This is a photograph of 102 Whalley Road, Clitheroe, Lancashire.  It was the home of my granddad and nannie – Fred and Florrie Musgrove.  Although they lived in other houses in Clitheroe this is the only one I ever knew.

I don’t know if the photograph gives an accurate impression of size.  There are four floors – a cellar with two rooms and a door leading to the back garden; ground floor with a front parlour, living room and kitchen; first floor with two bedrooms; and second floor with a further two bedrooms.

The house always seemed to have a warm and cozy feel.  I remember my granddad sitting in his armchair next to the coal fire.  My mother recalls the front bedroom on the first floor also having a fireplace and coal fire but doesn’t think any of the other bedrooms had fireplaces.

Whenever I think of Fred and Florrie I remember them at 102 Whalley Road.  However the original address was 26 Russell Street – the name changed sometime in the 1930’s.

The house was built probably early 19th century.  The block of numbers from 90-110 are now Grade II listed buildings – they were listed in September 1976.  The listing text on the British Listed Buildings website comments briefly on number 102 – the doorway to No. 102 has plain pilasters, cornice and entablature.

Looking back at the census returns I can see who lived at 26 Russell Street:-

• 1911 – William James Heyes, a cotton weaver, his wife and six children plus two of his wife’s sisters

• 1901 – Richard Bridge, a fire beater at the paper works, his wife and their ten children

• 1891 – James Hargreaves, a block cutter in the print works, his wife and five grandchildren

• 1881 – Mary Dewhurst, working at the paper mill, and her sister Ann

• 1871 – Mary Dewhurst, working at the paper mill, and her sister Ann.  Also Thomas Hargreaves, a plasterer and slater, and his wife and son

• 1861 – Thomas Dewhurst, a machine calico printer, and his two daughters Mary and Ann

• 1851 – Thomas Dewhurst, a machine printer, five children, three grandchildren and a son-in-law

These houses are now probably close on 200 years old and will no doubt be standing for many more years.