Family history

Military Monday – Herbert Bolton (1889-1917)

Herbert Bolton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Nicholas Bolton and Elizabeth Ann Ainsworth. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

Herbert was born in 1889 in Kendal, Westmorland and his birth is registered in Q1.

On the 19 February 1910 Herbert married Priscilla Harrington at St. James Church in Halifax, West Yorkshire. They set up home back in Kendal and the 1911 census shows them living at Yard No 5, 51 Stricklandgate, Kendal.

Herbert Bolton - Marriage 1910Herbert and Priscilla had two sons – John William born on 9 September 1911 and Sydney born on 1 September 1913.

Britain declared war on Germany on 4 August 1914. Ten days later on 14 August Herbert enlisted at Kendal. He was assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) 60th Field Ambulance. His military service number was 30398.

Herbert was initially assembled with the rest of the division in Aldershot. I found a medical record showing that he was hospitalised from 20 October 1914 to 20 November 1914 with gonorrhoea.

They spent several months undergoing training and getting their equipment in place. The Division was inspected by King George V at Knighton Down on 24 June 1915, by which time all equipment had arrived and the Division was judged ready for war.

Herbert embarked from Southampton on 20 July 1915 and arrived at Le Harve the next day. On 26 July 1915 the Division completed concentration in the Saint-Omer area, all units having crossed to France during the preceding few days. Early trench familiarisation and training took place in the Fleurbaix area.

The Division served on the Western Front for the remainder of the war, taking part in many of the significant actions.

Herbert’s military career was apparently going well and he was appointed to corporal on 29 September 1916 and then promoted to lance sergeant on 29 January 1917.

Things went badly wrong for Herbert when he received gunshot wounds to his back on 1 December 1917. I can’t be sure which battle this was in but I suspect it was as part of The Cambrai Operations – http://www.1914-1918.net/bat21.htm

Sadly Herbert died as a result of his wounds on 7 December 1917 in No. 16 General Hospital at Le Treport.

He is buried at the Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport. There are now 2128 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery and seven from the Second World War. The cemetery also contains more than 200 German war graves.

Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport

Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport

Priscilla was awarded a pension of 26s 8d from 10 June 1918 for herself and two children. Later that year she remarried in Newark, Nottinghamshire to James Hall.

Military Monday – John Ainsworth (1892-1916)

John Ainsworth is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Ralph Ainsworth and Margaret Ann Louisa Birkett. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

John was born in Kendal, Westmorland in 1892 and his birth is registered in Q1.

On the 27 May 1915 John signed up for military service at Carlisle – he was 23 years and 4 months. He was enlisted in The Border Regiment. His military number was 21851.

John was posted to France on 17 December 1915.

As far as I can tell John was fighting with the 2nd battalion Border Regiment when he was killed in action on 14 July 1916.

I can’t find any accurate information about the circumstances of his death. However the Battle of Bazentin Ridge began on 14 July 1916 so it is possible he was killed during that battle.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/bazentin.htm

John is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in France.

Thiepval Memorial

Thiepval Memorial

Military Monday – Hedley Duckworth

Hedley Duckworth is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents were John Thomas Duckworth and Clara Stowell. Our common ancestors are William and Ellen Stowell, my 3x great grandparents.

Hedley was born in Padiham, Lancashire in 1885 – his birth is registered in Q4.

In 1892 his mother Clara died and I’m not sure what happened to Hedley in the years up to the 1901 census. I haven’t yet been able to find his father with any confidence.

However in 1901 Hedley is stopping with his uncle Henry Weller and his aunt Olivia Weller (nee Stowell) – his mother’s sister. Also there is another aunt Ruth Stowell. They are living in Padiham and Hedley is employed as a “moulder”.

By 1911 Hedley has joined the military and in the census of that year he is shown as serving in Malta with the rank of sergeant.

I have found Hedley’s military records on FMP – but sadly they are of very little help.

I know that he signed up for service in the East Lancashire Regiment at the age of 17 on 24 July 1902. The records show that he was discharged five days later on 28 July 1902. I can’t find any other information about this.

I know that he served in the army during WW1 as I have found his medal roll card on http://www.ancestry.co.uk. He served in the Army Service Corps and his military number was M.21068.

Hedley was mentioned in despatches on 13 Jun 1916. This is the lowest form of recognition that was announced. The Mention in Despatches (M.I.D.) for a Soldier is not an award of a medal, but is a commendation of an act of gallantry or service. Here is a Wikipedia article about being mentioned in despatches http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentioned_in_dispatches

There is also an article in the Burnley Express on 2 January 1915 with a photograph of Hedley and he is described as Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. Here’s a link to the article – http://search.findmypast.co.uk/bna/viewarticle?id=bl%2f0000283%2f19150102%2f059

Burnley ExpressCONCERTS AT THE FRONT

Our readers have been much interested in the accounts of two concerts at the front, programmes of which have been sent us by Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. They appeared on Wednesday and the previous Wednesday, and were given at the billet at the front by the “Commer Car” artistes, so named because they belong to that section of the A.S.C. which has a good many of these lorries and wagons.

Company Sergt. Duckworth, who has been chairman of these concerts, which have been greatly appreciated by the men in that particular area, in the A.S.C. 2nd Divisional Supply Column, and has worked himself up from a private to his present rank. Actually, he is a Padiham man. He has been twelve years in the army, and is now on his 21st year’s term. Most of the time he has been in Malta, and he was not in the South African War. He was over in Burnley and Padiham recently on five days’ special leave.

In his first letter to us, alluding to the concert programme, he says: “I am sure there are a great number of people in Burnley and district who would be pleased to hear how the officers try to encourage the men. Of course, this has only occurred to my knowledge in this column, but you see it helps to cheer up us poor Tommies.”

Coy. Sergt.-Major Duckworth’s father is Mr. John T Duckworth, of Knowlwood Road, Todmorden, and formerly of Padiham. His portrait has been kindly sent us by his aunt, Mrs Jenkinson, of Nelson, whose husband is serving with the East Lancashire Regiment. Duckworth has also a step-brother in Egypt.

Black Sheep Sunday – John Britliff (The Killing Field) – Part 2

Just over a year ago I posted about my wife’s 3x great grandfather, John Britliff, who was convicted of manslaughter for killing his wife. Here’s a link to the original post – Black Sheep Sunday – John Britliff (The Killing Field) http://mikeydawson.wordpress.com/2013/02/24/black-sheep-sunday-john-britliff-the-killing-field/

Since then I have been contacted by Karen who lives in Australia – John Britliff is also her 3x great grandfather.

You will see from the original post that John was sentenced to 10 years transportation in 1843 but he was back in Lincolnshire by the time of the 1851 census. So this raised a number of questions for me:-

  • Did he really get transported?
  • If he did get transported for 10 years how come he is back in England after 8 years?
  • Did he get a “certificate of freedom” for good behaviour after serving part of his sentence?
  • How did he afford the fare back to England?

I have to admit I hadn’t made any progress answering these questions before now.

Karen alerted me to the use of Prison Ships (Hulks). Because of overcrowding in the prisons in Australia many convicts served their sentences on prison hulks moored on The Thames. Here’s a bit of background but there is lots more on the Internet – http://vcp.e2bn.org/justice/page11382-sentencing-to-departure-prison-hulks-convict-gaols.html

Anyway thanks to Karen I found some prison hulk records on Ancestry.co.uk. Fortunately these included the details for John Britliff or Britcliffe as he was described.

Image

So there we have it – John served his sentence on the hulk Warrior. He must have been given an early release for good behaviour and returned to Lincolnshire.

Black Sheep Sunday – Alfred Gawthrop

Alfred Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley, my 3x great grandparents.

Below is a report from the Burnley Express of 8 November 1916 when Alfred and eighteen other defendants were in court charged with drinking out of hours – in other words they were caught having a “lock in”.  

£78 IN FINES

Burnley Express - 8 November 1916

Burnley Express – 8 November 1916

NELSON AND DISTRICT DEFENDANTS

Some heavy fines were imposed by the magistrates at the Skipton Petty Sessions on Saturday in a licensing case which occupied four hours.  Mr. J. W. Morkill presided.

There were nineteen defendants in all.  The following were summoned for consuming intoxicating liquors on licensed premises, the Moor Cock Inn, Brogden (between Blacko and Gisburn), during closing hours:  John William Ogden, farmer;  Bolton Wilkinson, labourer;  Joseph Smith, farmer;  George Whitaker, millhand;  Fred Gott, carter;  Fred Snowden, carter;  Jonas Stephenson, carrier;  and Alfred Gawthrop, farmer, all of Cowling;  Benjamin Cawdrey, dealer, of Bradford;  Thomas Broughton, dealer;  Isabella Rhodes, married;  and Lilly West, weaver, of Colne;  James Ince, barber, Brierfield;  William Emmott, farmer, Blacko;  Brown Speake, farmer, and Walter Waddington, farmer, both of Nelson; and James Craddock, farmer, of Brogden.  Emmott was further summoned for treating, and West for being treated with intoxicating liquors on licensed premises.  Jane Utley, the landlady, was summoned for supplying intoxicating liquors, but owing to the fact that she was too ill to appear in court, the case against her was withdrawn.  The landlord, Isaac Utley, was summoned on three counts, for supplying liquor, for permitting it to be consumed on licensed premises during closing hours, and for permitting treating.  All the defendants pleaded “Not Guilty”.  Mr. J. C. Waddington, solicitor, Burnley, represented the landlord, while Mr. J. E. Newell, solicitor, Skipton, defended the men from Cowling.

For the prosecution, Police-Sergeant Williams and P.C. Milburn gave evidence as to what they witnessed after 9.30 at night on Thursday, when they were engaged in watching the inn.  The two officers said they saw three vehicles standing outside the Moor Cock, and persons who had occupied them had apparently gone inside the house and appeared to be having a very good time, for they could hear the piano being played and popular airs being sung.  They went to the rear of the premises, and through a broken window had a clear view into the tap-room, and could distinctly hear orders being given for drinks, while at times strong language was used.  Neither of the officers heard at any time any orders for mineral waters or food.  There was another window close to, which looked directly into the bar, and owing to the fact that the curtains did not come quite to the bottom the officers could see all that went on inside.  They saw the landlord and landlady filling beer, whisky, and stout, and subsequently take it into the smoke-room, where the company was seated.  The people inside were very rowdy.

That kind of thing, the officers stated, went on until 10-45pm., when they heard a voice shout, “Bring a —– whisky hot and a beer.”  They saw the landlord come to the bar, and then they slipped round to the front of the house and entered just in time to see the landlord going into the smoke-room with a tray on which there were a glass of whisky and a glass of beer.  They followed him into the room, and saw him place the whisky before the defendant West and  the beer before Emmott, who tendered 1s. in payment by placing it on the tray.  The landlord gave him some change and left the room, taking with him three glasses, which they saw emptied by some of the company.  Police-Sergeant Williams took the glass of whisky from the defendant West and a portion of the beer from Emmott.  He also took a glass of whisky from Wilkinson and a half-glass of beer from Ogden, all of which he produced.  At that time there were fourteen empty glasses on the tables.  The defendants were all told that they would be reported.

All the defendants, some on oath, denied that they were served with any intoxicating liquors after half-past 9.  Several of them stated that they ordered and were supplied with tea, bread and cheese.

The Bench retired to consider their decision, and on their return Mr. Morkill said that they had decided to convict in all cases, except in respect to the charge against the defendant West of being treated, which case would be dismissed.

The Bench imposed penalties of £20 in each of the first two summonses against the landlord, Utley, and £10 in the third, while Emmott was fined £5 for treating.  Fines of 40s. each were imposed on Ogden, Wilkinson, Smith, Whitaker, Gawthrop, Emmott, Speake, Waddington, and Craddock; and 20s. each on Gott, Snowden, Stephenson, Cawdrey, Broughton, Rhodes, West, and Ince.

Wedding Wednesday – Annie Gawthrop & Walter Bannister

Annie Gawthrop is 2nd cousin 2x removed.  She married Walter Bannister on 22 October 1919.  The report of the wedding from the Burnley Express of Saturday 25 October 1919 is below.

Burnley Express

Burnley Express

PRETTY WEDDING AT LANESHAWBRIDGE

The Wesleyan Church, Laneshawbridge, on Wednesday was the scene of a wedding of local interest.  the bridegroom was Mr. Walter Bannister, only son of Mr. J. T. Bannister, cotton manufacturer, Oak Leigh, Trawden, and the bride was Miss Annie Gawthrop, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benson Gawthrop, of Bridge House, Laneshawbridge, and formerly of Benside.  The bridesmaids were Miss Edith Gawthrop (sister of the bride) and Miss Emmeline Bannister (sister of the bridegroom).  Mr. Ed. Fishwick presided at the organ.  The Rev. John Gawthrop (uncle of the bride) was officiating minister.  The bride was given away by her father, and the bridegroom was attended by his cousin (Mr. Ernest Bannister) and Mr. Wilfred Lowcock.  Following the ceremony, a reception was held at Bridge House.  Later in the day the bride and bridegroom left for London.

The street where they lived – Brownlow Street, Clitheroe

My granddad, Frederick Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove was born in Citheroe on 1st February 1898.

He lived at 62 Moor Lane and then at 32 Salford.  I can’t find any photographs / images on the Internet of either of these houses.  I suspect that they were demolished sometime ago.

At the time of his marriage to Florrie Musgrove (no relation before they married) he was living at 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe.Screen Shot 2013-10-02 at 16.52.07

The earliest reference I can find to Brownlow Street in the Clitheroe census is for 1891. There are entries in earlier census returns for some streets in the same area.  So either I haven’t searched properly or Brownlow Street was built between 1881-1891 or perhaps it had another name before it became Brownlow Street.

Researching the history of Clitheroe I discovered that John Cust was elected as MP for the town in 1802.  He was the eldest son of the 1st Baron Brownlow.

John Cust was MP for Clitheroe until 1807 when he succeeded to his father’s title and he later became 1st Earl Brownlow in 1815.

Here’s a brief biography from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cust,_1st_Earl_Brownlow

I imagine that Brownlow Street was named after John Cust.

Looking at the census returns I can see who lived at 11 Brownlow Street from 1891 to 1911

1891 – Tipping Lord (63) a cotton weaver from Grindleton, Yorkshire.  He was living with his Eleanor (63) and two sons Edward (22) and James (20)

1901 – James Lord (30) was now head of the house.  He was employed as a life insurance agent.  He was living with his wife Annie (30) and their daughter Eleanor (3)

1911 – William Henry Mitchell (43) a cotton weaver from Clitheroe.  He was living with his wife Alice (42) and four children Harry (19), Mary Ellen (14), Reginald (10) and William (7).

So my granddad must have moved to 11 Brownlow Street sometime between 1911 and 1917 when he married.  I know that the house remained in the family until at least 1952 and was then sold.

Sunday Snap – Cononley Gala

This is a photograph taken probably sometime in the 1950’s or 1960’s I think. The woman in the long “short’ pants is my great aunt Jessie Brown (nee Hurtley).

I can’t be sure but I believe the picture was probably taken at the time of the Cononley Gala. They are carrying collecting tins and are no doubt intent on fleecing gala visitors of their hard earned cash!!!

Cononley is a small village in Airedale, Yorkshire about three miles south of Skipton. The village is an important place in my family history. During his childhood my dad spent many happy times here staying with his aunts and uncles.

Here is a link to the Cononley Village Website. The 2012 village gala was held yesterday and you can see photographs from last year on the website.

Tombstone Tuesday – Thomas and Alice Thompson

This gravestone is at Holy Trinity church in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

Buried here are Thomas Thompson, his wife Alice (nee Dawson) and their daughter Mary Ellen.

Alice Dawson is my 2nd cousin 3x removed – our common ancestors are my 4x great grandparents John Dawson and Ann Watson. She was born on 18 November 1848 to parents James Wright Dawson and Mary Thompson.

Alice married Thomas Thompson sometime in Q4 of 1870. They had at least five children:-

• Mary Ellen – c1872

• James – c1880

• Sarah Lizzie – c1884

• William – c1886

• John David – c1888

Thomas worked as a warp dresser most of his life.

Alice passed away on 9 October 1926 at the age of 77. Thomas survived for almost another nine years until he died at the age of 85 on 8 May 1935. Their daughter Mary Ellen didn’t marry and she passed away on 12 November 1959 aged 88.

Tombstone Tuesday – James and Dinah Harker

This headstone is at the grave of James Harker and his wife Dinah (Dawson) at Holy Trinity church, Cowling, West Yorkshire.

Dinah is my 2nd cousin 3x removed – our common ancestors are my 4x great grandparents John Dawson and Ann Watson.  Dinah was born in Cowling on 5 May 1853 to parents James Wright Dawson and Mary Thompson.

Sometime in Q3 of 1874 Dinah married James Harker, also from Cowling.  I haven’t done any research on James so at the moment I can’t tell you who is parents are.

James and Dinah had at least two children – Martha (c 1878) and Edith (c1880).

Between 1881 and 1911 James worked as warp loomer, presumably in one of local mills.  Dinah worked as a weaver until in the 1901 census she is described as ‘confectioner, own account’.  In 1911 her occupation is ‘confectioner sweets’.  I have this image of Dinah running her own sweet shop – you know the sort I mean, with large jars of sweets of all different kinds.

In 1911 the family was living at 121 Keighley Road, Cowling (see photograph below).  I wonder if Dinah was running her confectionery business from this address.

James died on 28 July 1924 at the age of 73 and Dinah passed away on 9 September 1932 aged 79.