Family history

Military Monday – John Espley (1883-1938)

John Espley is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Daniel Tilstone Espley and Jane Roe. The common ancestors of my wife and John are James Espley and Martha Silvester, my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

John was born in 1883 in Stockport, Cheshire and his birth is registered in Q1.

John enlisted for service on 22 November 1915 at the age of 32 years and 10 months. His military service number was 550125 and he was assigned to the Army Reserve.

It appears from the records I have been able to find on http://www.ancestry.co.uk that John did not face active service in France.

John was eventually mobilised on 18 April 1917. There is a letter from the War Office dated 14 April 1917 posting him to the Inland Waterway & Docks Section of The Royal Engineers.

Although I can’t find details of the promotion in the records available on http://www.ancestry.co.uk it appears that John achieved the rank of sergeant major.

He was demobilised on 28 April 1919.

After the war John married Florence Stead in 1920 in Stockport. He died on 23 September 1938.

Military Monday – Amos William Espley (1893-1969)

Amos William Espley is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are James Espley and Sarah Wakefield. The common ancestors of my wife and Amos are James Espley and Martha Silvester, my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Amos was born in 1893 in Stockport, Cheshire and his birth is registered in Q4.

On 7 September 1912 Amos married Florence Poole and they lived at 24 Long Side Street, Heaton Moss, Stockport. He was employed as a “carter”.

Amos enlisted in the army very quickly after was declared. He joined up in Halifax on 20 August 1914 and was assigned to the 8th Battalion The Duke Of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment. His military service number was 10920.

It appears from the records I have been able to find on http://www.ancestry.co.uk that Amos was stationed in Grantham in 1915. I haven’t been able to find any reference to service in France for example.

Amos “illegally absented himself without leave” from Grantham on 3 March 1915. There followed a Court of Inquiry on 1 April 1915 – see report below. The result was that Amos was “sent down”.

Amos William Espley - Court of Inquiry

Amos William Espley – Court of Inquiry

However I can’t find any record that he was physically found and incarcerated at all. There is reference in his military records that he was “struck off” as a deserter on 3 April 1915.

So I really have no idea what happened to Amos between 1915 and the end of the war, why he absented himself or what efforts the army made to find him.

Military Monday – Thomas Darby (1879-1945)

Thomas Darby is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are David Darby and Charlotte Farmer. Thomas and my wife’s common ancestors are Thomas Darby and Sarah Miles – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Thomas enlisted at the age of 35 years 11 months on 20 May 1915 in Worcester and his military service number was 30389. His occupation at the time was blacksmith.

Thomas listed his next of kin as his daughter Evelyn. His wife Polly (Chance) had died in 1914 at the age of 35.

Thomas embarked from Southampton on 3 October 1915 and disembarked the next day. He was posted to his battalion in the 6th Royal Warwickshire Regiment on 6 October 1915.

It seems that Thomas managed to remain unscathed until the following summer. He was then injured in action on 19 July 1916 when he received gun shot wounds to his head and arm. He was admitted to the field hospital for treatment.

The next day he was injured again with gun shot wounds to his shoulder and thigh.

Three days later on 23 July 1916 Thomas was discharged to the Base Depot.

After a couple of weeks it appears he was well enough to be attached to the 14th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and was back in action on 7 August 1916.

Over the next two years Thomas spent his time either on leave or in the battle field and does not seem to have suffered any further physical injuries.

He was demobilised on 6 February 1919.

Thomas was transferred to the Class Z Reserve on 7 Mar 1919.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918.  There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities.  Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z.  They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon.  The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Military Monday – Samuel Buckley (1886-1966)

Samuel Buckley is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Prince Buckley and Ada Smith. Our common ancestors are James Buckley and Sarah Tattersall, my 2x great grandparents.

Samuel was born on 28 September 1886 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

He attended a medical in Halifax, West Yorkshire on 5 July 1916 and enlisted on 9 July 1916. His military service number was 346859.

I can see from his military records on Ancestry that he was “at home: until 1 May 1918 and then he was on board ship from 2 May to 10 May.

Samuel was abroad with the British Expeditionary Force from 11 May 1918 to 24 July 1918. He returned to the UK on 25 July 1918 and spent the rest of his military career at various locations around the country as a fitter.

His military service wasn’t without incident however and there are two misconduct charges in his records.

The first one took place in Edinburgh on 18 January 1917 when he failed to salute an officer in Princes Street. He was confined to barracks for 5 days.

The second incident happened in June 1917 when he was late returning to barracks from a period of leave – he was late by 22 hours 10 minutes and lost 1 days pay.

Samuel was demobilized on 25 February 1919 and transferred to the Class Z Reserve.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Class Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Military Monday – Herbert Bolton (1889-1917)

Herbert Bolton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Nicholas Bolton and Elizabeth Ann Ainsworth. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

Herbert was born in 1889 in Kendal, Westmorland and his birth is registered in Q1.

On the 19 February 1910 Herbert married Priscilla Harrington at St. James Church in Halifax, West Yorkshire. They set up home back in Kendal and the 1911 census shows them living at Yard No 5, 51 Stricklandgate, Kendal.

Herbert Bolton - Marriage 1910Herbert and Priscilla had two sons – John William born on 9 September 1911 and Sydney born on 1 September 1913.

Britain declared war on Germany on 4 August 1914. Ten days later on 14 August Herbert enlisted at Kendal. He was assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) 60th Field Ambulance. His military service number was 30398.

Herbert was initially assembled with the rest of the division in Aldershot. I found a medical record showing that he was hospitalised from 20 October 1914 to 20 November 1914 with gonorrhoea.

They spent several months undergoing training and getting their equipment in place. The Division was inspected by King George V at Knighton Down on 24 June 1915, by which time all equipment had arrived and the Division was judged ready for war.

Herbert embarked from Southampton on 20 July 1915 and arrived at Le Harve the next day. On 26 July 1915 the Division completed concentration in the Saint-Omer area, all units having crossed to France during the preceding few days. Early trench familiarisation and training took place in the Fleurbaix area.

The Division served on the Western Front for the remainder of the war, taking part in many of the significant actions.

Herbert’s military career was apparently going well and he was appointed to corporal on 29 September 1916 and then promoted to lance sergeant on 29 January 1917.

Things went badly wrong for Herbert when he received gunshot wounds to his back on 1 December 1917. I can’t be sure which battle this was in but I suspect it was as part of The Cambrai Operations – http://www.1914-1918.net/bat21.htm

Sadly Herbert died as a result of his wounds on 7 December 1917 in No. 16 General Hospital at Le Treport.

He is buried at the Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport. There are now 2128 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery and seven from the Second World War. The cemetery also contains more than 200 German war graves.

Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport

Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport

Priscilla was awarded a pension of 26s 8d from 10 June 1918 for herself and two children. Later that year she remarried in Newark, Nottinghamshire to James Hall.

Military Monday – John Ainsworth (1892-1916)

John Ainsworth is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Ralph Ainsworth and Margaret Ann Louisa Birkett. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

John was born in Kendal, Westmorland in 1892 and his birth is registered in Q1.

On the 27 May 1915 John signed up for military service at Carlisle – he was 23 years and 4 months. He was enlisted in The Border Regiment. His military number was 21851.

John was posted to France on 17 December 1915.

As far as I can tell John was fighting with the 2nd battalion Border Regiment when he was killed in action on 14 July 1916.

I can’t find any accurate information about the circumstances of his death. However the Battle of Bazentin Ridge began on 14 July 1916 so it is possible he was killed during that battle.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/bazentin.htm

John is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in France.

Thiepval Memorial

Thiepval Memorial

Military Monday – Hedley Duckworth

Hedley Duckworth is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents were John Thomas Duckworth and Clara Stowell. Our common ancestors are William and Ellen Stowell, my 3x great grandparents.

Hedley was born in Padiham, Lancashire in 1885 – his birth is registered in Q4.

In 1892 his mother Clara died and I’m not sure what happened to Hedley in the years up to the 1901 census. I haven’t yet been able to find his father with any confidence.

However in 1901 Hedley is stopping with his uncle Henry Weller and his aunt Olivia Weller (nee Stowell) – his mother’s sister. Also there is another aunt Ruth Stowell. They are living in Padiham and Hedley is employed as a “moulder”.

By 1911 Hedley has joined the military and in the census of that year he is shown as serving in Malta with the rank of sergeant.

I have found Hedley’s military records on FMP – but sadly they are of very little help.

I know that he signed up for service in the East Lancashire Regiment at the age of 17 on 24 July 1902. The records show that he was discharged five days later on 28 July 1902. I can’t find any other information about this.

I know that he served in the army during WW1 as I have found his medal roll card on http://www.ancestry.co.uk. He served in the Army Service Corps and his military number was M.21068.

Hedley was mentioned in despatches on 13 Jun 1916. This is the lowest form of recognition that was announced. The Mention in Despatches (M.I.D.) for a Soldier is not an award of a medal, but is a commendation of an act of gallantry or service. Here is a Wikipedia article about being mentioned in despatches http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentioned_in_dispatches

There is also an article in the Burnley Express on 2 January 1915 with a photograph of Hedley and he is described as Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. Here’s a link to the article – http://search.findmypast.co.uk/bna/viewarticle?id=bl%2f0000283%2f19150102%2f059

Burnley ExpressCONCERTS AT THE FRONT

Our readers have been much interested in the accounts of two concerts at the front, programmes of which have been sent us by Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. They appeared on Wednesday and the previous Wednesday, and were given at the billet at the front by the “Commer Car” artistes, so named because they belong to that section of the A.S.C. which has a good many of these lorries and wagons.

Company Sergt. Duckworth, who has been chairman of these concerts, which have been greatly appreciated by the men in that particular area, in the A.S.C. 2nd Divisional Supply Column, and has worked himself up from a private to his present rank. Actually, he is a Padiham man. He has been twelve years in the army, and is now on his 21st year’s term. Most of the time he has been in Malta, and he was not in the South African War. He was over in Burnley and Padiham recently on five days’ special leave.

In his first letter to us, alluding to the concert programme, he says: “I am sure there are a great number of people in Burnley and district who would be pleased to hear how the officers try to encourage the men. Of course, this has only occurred to my knowledge in this column, but you see it helps to cheer up us poor Tommies.”

Coy. Sergt.-Major Duckworth’s father is Mr. John T Duckworth, of Knowlwood Road, Todmorden, and formerly of Padiham. His portrait has been kindly sent us by his aunt, Mrs Jenkinson, of Nelson, whose husband is serving with the East Lancashire Regiment. Duckworth has also a step-brother in Egypt.