Ellen Stowell

Military Monday – Hedley Duckworth

Hedley Duckworth is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents were John Thomas Duckworth and Clara Stowell. Our common ancestors are William and Ellen Stowell, my 3x great grandparents.

Hedley was born in Padiham, Lancashire in 1885 – his birth is registered in Q4.

In 1892 his mother Clara died and I’m not sure what happened to Hedley in the years up to the 1901 census. I haven’t yet been able to find his father with any confidence.

However in 1901 Hedley is stopping with his uncle Henry Weller and his aunt Olivia Weller (nee Stowell) – his mother’s sister. Also there is another aunt Ruth Stowell. They are living in Padiham and Hedley is employed as a “moulder”.

By 1911 Hedley has joined the military and in the census of that year he is shown as serving in Malta with the rank of sergeant.

I have found Hedley’s military records on FMP – but sadly they are of very little help.

I know that he signed up for service in the East Lancashire Regiment at the age of 17 on 24 July 1902. The records show that he was discharged five days later on 28 July 1902. I can’t find any other information about this.

I know that he served in the army during WW1 as I have found his medal roll card on http://www.ancestry.co.uk. He served in the Army Service Corps and his military number was M.21068.

Hedley was mentioned in despatches on 13 Jun 1916. This is the lowest form of recognition that was announced. The Mention in Despatches (M.I.D.) for a Soldier is not an award of a medal, but is a commendation of an act of gallantry or service. Here is a Wikipedia article about being mentioned in despatches http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentioned_in_dispatches

There is also an article in the Burnley Express on 2 January 1915 with a photograph of Hedley and he is described as Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. Here’s a link to the article – http://search.findmypast.co.uk/bna/viewarticle?id=bl%2f0000283%2f19150102%2f059

Burnley ExpressCONCERTS AT THE FRONT

Our readers have been much interested in the accounts of two concerts at the front, programmes of which have been sent us by Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. They appeared on Wednesday and the previous Wednesday, and were given at the billet at the front by the “Commer Car” artistes, so named because they belong to that section of the A.S.C. which has a good many of these lorries and wagons.

Company Sergt. Duckworth, who has been chairman of these concerts, which have been greatly appreciated by the men in that particular area, in the A.S.C. 2nd Divisional Supply Column, and has worked himself up from a private to his present rank. Actually, he is a Padiham man. He has been twelve years in the army, and is now on his 21st year’s term. Most of the time he has been in Malta, and he was not in the South African War. He was over in Burnley and Padiham recently on five days’ special leave.

In his first letter to us, alluding to the concert programme, he says: “I am sure there are a great number of people in Burnley and district who would be pleased to hear how the officers try to encourage the men. Of course, this has only occurred to my knowledge in this column, but you see it helps to cheer up us poor Tommies.”

Coy. Sergt.-Major Duckworth’s father is Mr. John T Duckworth, of Knowlwood Road, Todmorden, and formerly of Padiham. His portrait has been kindly sent us by his aunt, Mrs Jenkinson, of Nelson, whose husband is serving with the East Lancashire Regiment. Duckworth has also a step-brother in Egypt.

Military Monday – Harry Musgrove (1889-1974)

Harry Musgrove is my great uncle – my maternal grandfathers brother. He was born 17 November 1889 to parents Thomas Musgrove and Ellen Stowell.

I have been lucky enough to find Harry’s WW1 service record on www.ancestry.co.uk.

Harry enlisted in Clitheroe, Lancashire on 11 November 1915 – six days before his 26th birthday.  At the time he was living at 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe and working as a ‘weaver’.

He served as a private in the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) and his service number was 103760.

It looks like Harry was initially assigned to the ‘home hospital’ reserve in Blackpool, Lancashire.  Then in May 1917 he ‘volunteered’ for overseas service – see below.

next information about his service shows that he was in Corsica from 9 June 1917 to 31 December 1918.  Harry returned home at the beginning of 1919 and according to his service papers was ‘demobbed’ on 23 February 1919 and transferred to the Class Z Reserve.

There is a note in the papers addressed to the Officer in Charge at the Queen Mary’s Military Hospital, Whalley, Lancashire.  This note was sent with Harry’s ‘medical history’ sheet on 16 January 1919.  On one of the documents is stamped ‘sick and wounded’ but I can’t find any information about Harry’s condition at the time.

The Queen Mary’s Military Hospital was formerly the Whalley Asylum. It was used as a military hospital  until June 1920. There is also a military cemetery attached to the hospital.

Queen Mary’s Military Hospital

Harry married Edith Hitchen on 20 January 1940.  He died on 25 November 1974 – eight days after his 85th birthday.

On this day…..24th March

1861     Ellen Stowell was born in Burnley, Lancashire.  Her parents were John Stowell (1828-1885) and Ann Astin (1831-1902).  She is my great grandmother.

2007     Doris Musgrove ( nee Jackson) died in Burnley, Lancashire.  She was my aunty and married to (Joseph) Harry Musgrove.