Ann Ridley

Military Monday – Robert Alexander Carradice (1890-1919)

Robert Alexander Carradice is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Alexander Carradice and Adela Ormande Birkhead. Our common ancestor are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

Robert was born in Kendal, Westmorland in 1890, his birth is registered in Q3.

There are no military records available for Robert either at http://www.ancestry.co.uk or http://www.findmypast.co.uk. However there is reference to him on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website at http://www.cwgc.org and on http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk.

I know that Robert was a Sapper with the Royal Engineers and his service number was WR/327227.

Royal Engineers Badge

Royal Engineers Badge

The available information also says that Robert died on 8 February 1919.

So I have no information about his war time service or what lead up to his death. I can only surmise that he died at home. His death is recorded in the England & Wales registers and there is a gravestone for him in Kendal Parkside Cemetery.

Robert Alexander Carradice - Kendal Parkside Cemetery

Robert Alexander Carradice – Kendal Parkside Cemetery

Military Monday – Herbert Bolton (1889-1917)

Herbert Bolton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Nicholas Bolton and Elizabeth Ann Ainsworth. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

Herbert was born in 1889 in Kendal, Westmorland and his birth is registered in Q1.

On the 19 February 1910 Herbert married Priscilla Harrington at St. James Church in Halifax, West Yorkshire. They set up home back in Kendal and the 1911 census shows them living at Yard No 5, 51 Stricklandgate, Kendal.

Herbert Bolton - Marriage 1910Herbert and Priscilla had two sons – John William born on 9 September 1911 and Sydney born on 1 September 1913.

Britain declared war on Germany on 4 August 1914. Ten days later on 14 August Herbert enlisted at Kendal. He was assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) 60th Field Ambulance. His military service number was 30398.

Herbert was initially assembled with the rest of the division in Aldershot. I found a medical record showing that he was hospitalised from 20 October 1914 to 20 November 1914 with gonorrhoea.

They spent several months undergoing training and getting their equipment in place. The Division was inspected by King George V at Knighton Down on 24 June 1915, by which time all equipment had arrived and the Division was judged ready for war.

Herbert embarked from Southampton on 20 July 1915 and arrived at Le Harve the next day. On 26 July 1915 the Division completed concentration in the Saint-Omer area, all units having crossed to France during the preceding few days. Early trench familiarisation and training took place in the Fleurbaix area.

The Division served on the Western Front for the remainder of the war, taking part in many of the significant actions.

Herbert’s military career was apparently going well and he was appointed to corporal on 29 September 1916 and then promoted to lance sergeant on 29 January 1917.

Things went badly wrong for Herbert when he received gunshot wounds to his back on 1 December 1917. I can’t be sure which battle this was in but I suspect it was as part of The Cambrai Operations – http://www.1914-1918.net/bat21.htm

Sadly Herbert died as a result of his wounds on 7 December 1917 in No. 16 General Hospital at Le Treport.

He is buried at the Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport. There are now 2128 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery and seven from the Second World War. The cemetery also contains more than 200 German war graves.

Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport

Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport

Priscilla was awarded a pension of 26s 8d from 10 June 1918 for herself and two children. Later that year she remarried in Newark, Nottinghamshire to James Hall.

Military Monday – Thomas Carradice

Thomas Carradice is my 2nd cousin 2x removed.  Our common ancestors are my 3x great parents, John Carradice and Ann Ridley.

Thomas was born in Kendal, Westmorland – his birth is registered in the June quarter of 1884.

By the time of the 1901 census Thomas was living in Bradford, West Yorkshire with his father John Carradice and step-mother Sarah Jane Lightowler.  His mother Mary having died in 1892.  Thomas was working as a ‘wool comb minder’.

He enlisted in the West Yorkshire Regiment on 12 June 1903 – his service number is 7095.  He is described as 5 feet 6 inches in height and weighing 115lbs.  His religion is given as Church of England.

The next piece of information I have is a note dated 13 November 1903 that Thomas appears to have been charged with fraudulently enlisting in the ‘R I Regiment’.  He was tried and convicted and sentenced to 6 months imprisonment with hard labour.  He was then to be discharged with ‘ignominy’ – see extract below.

I have not been able to find any other details about this.

I found Thomas in the 1911 census still living in Bradford and working as a ‘moulders labourer’.  I haven’t done any more research on him except to identify a potential death record in the September quarter of 1921 in the North Bierley registration district of West Yorkshire.

Military Monday – Herbert Carradice (1896-1935)

Herbert Mark Carradice is my 1st cousin 3x removed – our common ancestors are my 3x great grandparents John Carradice and Ann Ridley.  Herbert was born in Kendal, Westmorland, to parents Alexander Carradice and Adela Ormandy Birkhead.  His birth is registered in the December quarter of 1895.

I have been lucky enough to find his WW1 service records on www.ancestry.co.uk so I know that Herbert enlisted on 3 October 1916 at Carlisle, Cumberland.  His regimental service number is 242249 (or 4360) and he was assigned to the 4th Border Regiment.  His age is given as 20 years 10 months and his occupation is ‘tailor’.

Herbert’s ‘military history sheet’ shows that he was at home from 3 October 1916 to 14 January 1917.  He embarked for Boulogne on 15 January 1917.

The next piece of information shows that Herbert was wounded in action on 3 July 1917 and was moved to Etaples Military Hospital.  He presumably recovered well enough from his injuries and rejoined his battalion on 2 September 1917.

As Christmas approached Herbert was granted leave from 24 December 1917 to 7 January 1918.

MISSING is stamped on his record on 10 April 1918.  Underneath that is a note dated 6 November 1918 that Herbert is a ‘prisoner of war’ but the location is unclear’.  Another document in his records shows that Herbert was captured on 21 March 1918 and interred in the town of Roisel.

On 10 December 1918 Herbert’s service record shows that he arrived back in England as a ‘repatriated prisoner of war’.

During Herbert’s time as a ‘prisoner of war’ his father, Alexander, was clearly anxious about his son.  On 14 April 1918, having not heard from Herbert for over a month Alexander wrote to the army asking for information.

On 18 May 1918 Alexander wrote again to the army sending on to them a postcard he had received from Herbert in Germany.  It seems that the army had asked Alexander to let them know if he had any contact from Herbert ‘so that his pay will not stop’.  Akexander asked for the postcard to be returned to him – I wonder if t ever was.

Alexander subsequently had a letter from Herbert and wrote to the Army Pay Office on 15 July 1918 asking if he was allowed to send a parcel to Herbert.

Herbert was finally ‘demobbed’ on 26 Novemeber 1919.  However, like many of his comrades he was retained in the Class Z Reserve.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918.  There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities.  Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z.  They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon.  The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Herbert married Hilda Marshall in Kendal, Westmorland sometime in the September quarter of 1927.  They had two children – Audrey in 1928 and Edwin in 1929.

Herbert died in 1935 – he was only 39.

Wedding Wednesday – John Carradice & Ann Ridley

My 3x great grandparents were married on this day in 1829 – sadly neither of them are still alive to celebrate the event.

John Carradice was born in Kendal in the county of Westmoreland about 1807 and Ann Ridley was born at Alston in Cumberland about 1810.

I found details of their marriage in the IGI but I haven’t yet been to the Records Office to check the information.  I was able to confirm Ann’s maiden name from my 2x great grandmother’s birth certificate – although deciphering the handwriting took quite a while.

Carradice is one of those names with a number of variants as well as deviants and the IGI records John’s name as Carradus.

I have no idea how the couple met and why they married in Kendal and not Alston for example.

John and Ann had thirteen children between 1831 and 1854.

William – c1829

John – c1831

Solomon – c1834

Mary – c1836

Thomas – c1838

Elizabeth – c1841

Ellen – c1842

Ann – c1844

David – c1846

Isaac – c1848

James – c1850

Alexander – c1852

Mary Jane – 8th November 1854 (my 2x great grandmother)

I found John and Ann in all the census returns between 1841 and 1871 – they remained in Kendal all the time.

In 1841 the Ancestry index had them as Carradine and in 1871 as Carradas.  A good example why genealogists need to be resourceful and use all their detective skills.

John was employed as a weaver all his working life.

Ann died about 1872 and John about 1873.

Other noteable events in 1829:-

Also on 2nd February Jonathan Martin set fire to York Minster

Andrew Jackson succeeded John Quincy Adams as the 7th President of the USA

Stephensons Rocket wins the Rainhill Trials

Oxford win the first University Boat Race