Wedding Wednesday

Wedding Wednesday – Mystery Couple

This photograph is from a large collection inherited from my grandparents when they died. Unfortunately most of them are not attributed in any way. So it is a challenge trying to work out who people are. I am resigned to accepting that I will never know for sure but I can still enjoy the images all the same.

This photograph has the photographers name and address embossed in the bottom right hand corner. It looks like F. Shuttleworth, West Lane, Haworth. This certainly puts the happy couple in the geographical area of my Dawson ancestors from around Keighley in West Yorkshire. So perhaps they are relatives.

There is no indication as to when the photograph was taken. I have seen other photographs by F. Shuttleworth on internet auction sites and they all seem to be from the 1920’s. And that would also be my guess for when this wedding took place – or maybe even a little earlier. Does anyone have an alternative suggestion?

Wedding Wednesday – Thomas Turner & Mary Jane Carradice

My 2x great grandparents married today 139 years ago.

Thomas Turner was born in Kendal, Westmorland about 1847 although I haven’t yet been able to find a definite record of his birth.

Mary Jane Carradice was born on 8th November 1854 also in Kendal.

They married on 29th June 1872 at Kendal Register Office.  The witnesses were Miles Barry Harker and Hannah Harker.

I had never come across the name Harker before in my family tree.  So while preparing this post I decided to see if I could find any connection between Miles and Hannah and Thomas and Mary Jane.

The only link I have been able to establish is that all four appear on the same page of the marriage register – which clearly suggests to me that they were married on the same day at Kendal Register Office.

Presumably Miles Barry Harker and Hannah Fisher tied the knot first given the witness names on Thomas and Mary Jane’s marriage certificate.  I wonder if Thomas and Mary Jane performed the role of witnesses for Miles and Hannah.  Maybe they were all friends or perhaps this was the first time they had even met.

The lack of family witnesses has me thinking that perhaps Thomas and Mary Jane married without their families consent – or am I reading too much into this.  I guess that I will never know.

Whatever the circumstances of their marriage they went on to have at least ten children:-

  • Elizabeth Ann – 31st May 1873 (my great grandmother)
  • John – c1877
  • Thomas and William – 27 August 1878 (William died the same day and Thomas ten days later)
  • Ellen – 10th November 1879
  • Mary Jane – 8th January 1882
  • Alexander – 27th November 1884
  • Isabella – 24th February 1887
  • James – c1892
  • Ivy – c1897

Over the years the family migrated south to Clitheroe in Lancashire.

Thomas died on 7th December 1916 and Mary Jane on 18th April 1917.

Wedding Wednesday – Flapper Girl?

I found this photograph in a tin I brought from my mum and dad. There are loads of photographs – some old and others more recent. I know some of the people, can guess at a few of the others and have no idea about the majority.

I have on my “to do” list getting my mum to go through the photographs and trying to put more names to faces.

Anyway, this particular photograph falls in to the category of “I have no idea who they are”.

I thought that I had struck lucky when I turned the photograph over and saw an inscription on the back. Then I read “This is us leaving the church after the wedding” – well I think I could have made quite a good stab at that myself. I just wanted to shout why didn’t you sign it “with love ….” or something.

I am guessing that the period is sometime in the 1920’s. Is the bride’s dress and head ware a bit “flapperish”? It looks like it to me.

So, whoever you are I hope you enjoyed your wedding day and had a happy life together. I might find out more about you in the future.

Wedding Wednesday – Daniel Owen Espley & Betsy Skelding

Daniel Owen Espley and Betsy Skelding were married on 20 April 1908. They are my wife’s grandparents.

Owen was born on 14 March 1886 in Biddulph, Staffordshire. His parents were Frederick Espley and Frances Owen.

Betsy was born one year and one day later on 15 March 1887 in Lye, Staffordshire. Her parents were Imri Skelding and Sarah Anne Darby.

By the time of the 1901 census Owen and Betsy were both living in Smallthorne, Staffordshire. I checked on Google Maps and their addresses are fairly near to each other. However we have no knowledge about how they first met.

They were married at the Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel in Smallthorne. The marriage was registered in the district of Leek, Staffordshire. We took the photograph below when we visited the area a few years ago.

Salem Methodist Chapel, Smallthorne

The minister conducting the service was James E Woodfield.

The two witnesses were Samuel Skelding (Betsy’s brother) and Rose Espley, who I believe is the wife of Owen’s brother Richard Henry Espley.

At the time of their marriage Owen was working as a coal miner. There is no occupation for Betsy on the marriage certificate.

Wedding Wednesday – John Carradice & Ann Ridley

My 3x great grandparents were married on this day in 1829 – sadly neither of them are still alive to celebrate the event.

John Carradice was born in Kendal in the county of Westmoreland about 1807 and Ann Ridley was born at Alston in Cumberland about 1810.

I found details of their marriage in the IGI but I haven’t yet been to the Records Office to check the information.  I was able to confirm Ann’s maiden name from my 2x great grandmother’s birth certificate – although deciphering the handwriting took quite a while.

Carradice is one of those names with a number of variants as well as deviants and the IGI records John’s name as Carradus.

I have no idea how the couple met and why they married in Kendal and not Alston for example.

John and Ann had thirteen children between 1831 and 1854.

William – c1829

John – c1831

Solomon – c1834

Mary – c1836

Thomas – c1838

Elizabeth – c1841

Ellen – c1842

Ann – c1844

David – c1846

Isaac – c1848

James – c1850

Alexander – c1852

Mary Jane – 8th November 1854 (my 2x great grandmother)

I found John and Ann in all the census returns between 1841 and 1871 – they remained in Kendal all the time.

In 1841 the Ancestry index had them as Carradine and in 1871 as Carradas.  A good example why genealogists need to be resourceful and use all their detective skills.

John was employed as a weaver all his working life.

Ann died about 1872 and John about 1873.

Other noteable events in 1829:-

Also on 2nd February Jonathan Martin set fire to York Minster

Andrew Jackson succeeded John Quincy Adams as the 7th President of the USA

Stephensons Rocket wins the Rainhill Trials

Oxford win the first University Boat Race

Wedding Wednesday – Wartime Hitch

My Parents married on 4th January 1941 at St James Church in Grimsby Lincolnshire. Grimsby was my mother’s home town but at some point she moved about 30 miles away to Sutton-on-Sea on the Lincolnshire coast to help my dad run a little glass and china business. My brother married in the same church 30 years later because, coincidentally, he married a Grimsby girl.
  
 
Both my parents had unusual surnames. Mum was a Britliffe – more commonly spelt with a ’c’ as in Britcliffe and Dad’s name was Espley. They also both had shortened versions of first names – Dad was Fred rather than Fredrick and mum was Bessie which is usually given to girls christened as Elizabeth.  
 

I’m not sure how my parents met. Both are now dead so I can’t ask. My Dad died in 1977 before I took any interest in their history and I never had the sort of relationship with my mum that lead to any discussion about ‘the old days’. In her later years when Mike started to research our family history she had great difficulty understanding why we would want to do such a thing.

Anyway I think my father must have been stationed in Grimsby during the war. He had a bout of polio when he was small and was deaf in one ear so wasn’t sent overseas. Certainly at some point dad was moved to Pontefract, West Yorkshire, because I know mum visited him at the barracks there. I am not sure if this was before or after the wedding.

Dad was nine years older than mum. Her dad was suspicious of this and told her that Fred was probably already married with kids. Mum disliked her dad and he didn’t attend the wedding. I am not sure whether he was working, he simply chose not to go or mum asked him not to attend.

My Uncle Jack – Mum’s brother- second from the right in the photo, gave her away. Dad’s Best Man was his brother Frank. The smallest two Bridesmaids are my cousins Shirley and Tessa but I don’t know the identities of anyone else in the photo.

The dresses were all made of velvet which must have been fabulous for a winter wedding. I am not sure how they got hold of all this fabric during the war. I believe the small Bridesmaids were in lilac and perhaps, therefore, the grown up attendants were in purple. The two colours would seem to go together.

The other thing I know is that mum had asked dad to buy a suit as she didn’t want him to get married in his army uniform. Obviously he ignored her! Luckily it didn’t make her change her mind and they were happily married for 36 years.

Jayne