Surname Saturday

Surname Saturday – Dinsdale

The surname Dinsdale appears six times in my family tree.  The earliest person is John Dinsdale, my 3x great grandfather.  The other five are all his children – four daughters and one son:-

Elsy – born about 1816

John – born  about 1819

Mary – born about 1819

Hannah – born about 1821 (my 2x great grandmother)

Alice – born about 1824

According to surnamedb Dinsdale is of locational origin from places called “Low Dinsdale” in Durham, recorded as “Ditneshall” in the Early Yorkshire Charters (c1185) and “Over Dinsdale” in Yorkshire, appearing as “Digneshale” in the Domesday Book of 1086.

My Dinsdale’s appear to come from Arncliffe in the Yorkshire Dales.  So far I have not had much success in finding them in the census records but I am having another go after I finish writing and publishing this post.

Surname Saturday – Paley

The Paley surname is on my paternal side of the family.  So far I have a total of 38 Paley ancestors.  The earliest confirmed Paley is my 3x great grandfather William (1797-1882).  I have identified from Family Search a Margaret Payley as a possible mother of William but I haven’t yet been to examine the parish records.

According to surnamedb Paley is of English locational origins.  It is said to derive from a hamlet within the parish of Giggleswick, North Yorkshire, known as Paley Green.  In the 18th century Paley Green consisted of just two farms.

My Paley’s certainly appear to come from this area.

Early recordings of the name include Robertus de Palay of Littondale, in the parish of Arncliffe in the 1379 Poll Tax Rolls; and John Paley of Melling, also in Yorkshire, whose will was recorded at Chester in 1591.

As the name moved away from its original roots the spellings became more varied and include Palay, Paley, Payley, Palley, Pally, Paylie and Paily.

Church recordings include examples such as Edward Palia, christened at St. Mary at Hill, London on 23rd August 1568.  Also Elizabeth Palley, who married Robert Hales at St. James church, Clerkenwell, London on 12th September 1612.

There is said to be an interesting recording in Barbados in the parish registers of 1679.  That is of Adrian Paily who held five acres of land and had one servant.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be Adam de Palay, which is dated 1379 in the Poll Tax Rolls for Giggleswick.

Here is a link to the Langcliffe village website and an article about the Paley family of Langliffe and Ampton.  I haven’t yet found a direct link to the Paley’s mentioned in the article but I’m sure that there is one.

Surname Saturday – Astin

I have only seven Astin’s so far in my family tree – it is a name I haven’t researched very much.  The earliest Astin is my 3x great grandfather Robert who was born about 1805 in Wakefield, West Yorkshire.  The other six are Robert’s children including my 2x great grandmother Ann who was born about 1831 in Rough Lee, Lancashire.

According to surnamedb Astin is of Old Scandinavian (Norse) origin, and is a Norman form of the Old Norse personal name “Asketill”.  It was apparently a popular male personal name before the Norman Conquest of 1066, having been introduced by Viking invaders many years earlier.

The name can be found in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Aschil”.  There is a Robertus filius (a son of) Astin mentioned in 1219 in the Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire.

The surname itself was first recorded in the early 13th Century, and one Hugh Astyn was listed in the Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire in 1297.  Also John Asketyn and William Hastin were both noted in the Assize Court Rolls of Kent in 1317.

Recordings from London Church Registers include: the marriage of Ales Astin and Amys Allin at St. Margaret’s, Westminster, on April 13th 1602, and the marriage of Henrie Astin and Jane Ginninges on October 16th 1615, at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney. There is a William Astin buried in the parish of St. Michael’s, in the Barbadoes, on July 30th 1678.

Modern day variants  include Askin, Astins, Ashken, Haskin, Haskins and Hasting. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Astin, which was dated 1230, in the “Pipe Rolls of Devonshire”

Surname Saturday – Gawthrop

The surname Gawthrop features in my paternal line.  My 2x great grandmother is Ellen Gawthrop (1824-1892) and my 3x great grandfather is Martin Gawthrop (1800-1860). I haven’t yet been able to find any concrete evidence for Martin’s parents but continue to research the name.

According to surnamedb  the name is of Old Norse origin, and is a locational name from either of two places in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Gawthope near Dewsbury is recorded as “Goukethorpe” in the 1274 Wakefield Court Rolls, and Gawthorpe near Huddersfield is recorded as “Goutthorp” in the 1297 Subsidy Rolls.

The derivation of the placename is from the Old Norse “gaukr”, cuckoo, and “thorp”, enclosure, hamlet, village; hence, “village where cuckoo’s frequented”.

During the Middle Ages, when migration for the purpose of job-seeking was becoming more common, people often took their former village name as a means of identification, thus resulting in a wide dispersal of the name.

The surname has many variant spellings ranging from Gawthrope, Gowthrop and Gawthrop, to Gawthorp, Gawthorpe and Gowthorpe. Recordings of the surname from Yorkshire Church Registers include: the marriage of Beatrice Gawthorpe and Henry Leigh, which took place at Howden, on May 10th 1572; the marriage of Richard Gawthorpe and Elizabeth Holroyd, which took place on February 14th 1573, at Halifax; and the christening of Robert, son of Thomas Gawthorpe, on August 28th 1580, at Aberford.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Jane Galthorpe, which was dated August 15th 1540, when she married Roger Belman, at Rotherham, South Yorkshire, during the reign of King Henry V111.

Surname Saturday – Ainsworth

The Ainsworth’s in my family are on my maternal grandfather’s side.  The earliest person I have found so far is Thomas Ainsworth, my 4 x great grandfather.

According to the website surnamedb the name is of Anglo-Saxon origin.  It is said to be a locational name from a place called Ainsworth in Lancashire, which is recorded as “Hainewrthe”, around 1200 in the Pipe Rolls of Lancashire, and as “Aynesworth” in the Assize Court Rolls of 1285.

The placename is composed of the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name “Aegen” meaning own, plus “worth”, a homestead; hence “Aegen’s homestead”.

The surname is said to date back to the early 14th Century, and early recordings include John de Aynesworth, who appears in Baines “History of Lancashire” in 1370.  Church records list the christening of Richard Ainsworth on July 25th 1567 in Winwick, Lancashire.

One Robert Ainsworth (1660-1743) was educated at Botton, and published a much acclaimed treatise on education in 1698; he also compiled a Latin-English dictionary in 1736.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is said to be that of William de Aynesworth, which was dated 1332 in the “Lay Subsidy Rolls of Lancashire” during the reign of King Edward III.

My own Ainsworth’s come from Darwen in Lancashire exactly from the area where history suggests the name originates.

A  Google search of Ainsworth produces lots of family websites and genealogy information.  I have chosen to give you a link here to a website with information about the family name and further links to the Ainsworth Genealogy forum.

There will be more to come about my Ainsworth ancestors in the future.

Surname Saturday – Carradice

The name Carradice is on my mother’s side of the family. The earliest ancestor with the name I have found is my is 3x great grandfather John Carradice. He was born in Kendal, Westmorland (United Kingdom) about 1807. There are potential candidates for his father in the records but I haven’t yet been able to determine the right person. This is a work in progress.

 According to surnamedb Carradice is an interesting and unusual name of Medieval Scottish origin. It is said to be a phonetic variant of the locational name Carruthers. This apparently comes from the parish of Middlebie, Dumfriesshire and pronounced in local speech as “Cridders”.

 Modern variants include – Crothers, Carrodus, Cardis, Cruddace and Caruth.

I rather like our family folklore interpretation which suggests that the name is of Italian origin and should be pronounced “Carradeechie”

Anyway, my John Carradice married Ann Ridley in Kendal on 2nd February 1829. They had at least 13 children. Their youngest child, Mary Jane is my 2x great grandmother. She was born 8th November 1854 – it’s her birthday in a couple of days, must remember to raise a glass in celebration. Mary Jane married Thomas Turner on 29th June 1872 at the Register Office in Kendal and she died on 18th April 1917 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I do not have any photographs of any of my Carradice ancestors but keep searching the Internet in the forlorn hope that one might turn up from a long lost relative somewhere.

Surname Saturday – Musgrove

Today I want to tell you about the Musgrove family name.  Both my maternal grandparents were called Musgrove – Fred Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove.   

According to the website surnamedb ( http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Musgrove) Musgrove is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a locational name deriving from a pair of villages near Kirkby Stephen in Westmorland, called Great and Little Musgrave.  The early settlement is recorded as “Musegrave” around 1215, and as “Magna” and “Parva Musegrave” (Great and Little) in the “Records of Pleas” of 1292.

The placename is said to derive from the old English pre 7th century elements “mus”, mouse, or the old Norse byname “Musi”, with “graf”, grove – so “grove frequented by mice”, or “Musi’s grove”.

A number of English placenames have “Mus” as a first part, including Musbury (Lancashire), “mouse burrow”, and Muscoates (Yorkshire), “mouse infested huts”.

Some early examples of the surname include Roger de Mussegrave (1277, London); Thomas de Musgraue (1362, Yorkshire) and John Mosgrove, listed in the University of Oxford’s Register for 1581.  The first recorded spelling of the name is believed to be that of Alan de Musegrave, which was dated 1228, in the “Curia Rolls of Northumberland”, during the reign of King Henry III, known as “The Frenchman”, 1216-1272.

My post last week (St Catherine’s House) explained about my early difficulty finding the birth certificate for Florrie Musgrove which was in fact recorded as Mosgrove.

I have traced my two Musgrove lines back to Kendal in Westmorland.  On my granfather’s side I can go back to my 3xgreat grandfather, Joseph Musgrove who was born c1791 in Kendal. He was a blacksmith and at some point moved south to the Clitheroe / Whalley area of Lancashire where he met and married Jane Dewhurst.

On my grandmother’s side I go back to my 3xgreat grandfather, William Musgrove who was born about 1795 and married Harriot Francis on 30 October 1815 in Kendal.  My 2xgreat grandfather, Harrison Musgrove (1834-1868) and my great grandfather, Joseph Musgrove (1866-1933) were also born in the Kendal / Kirkland area of Westmorland.  This Joseph moved south to Clitheroe via Settle and Horton in Ribblesdale.

Other people researching my grandmother’s line have gone back three further generations to my 6xgreat grandfather, Joseph Musgreave born about 1703 in Hawkshead (Lancashire).  I haven’t yet checked this information – it’s on my list of things to do (which is growing longer every week!!)