Author: mike

Black Sheep Sunday – Harrison Musgrove (Part 2)

Well I’m sure you’ve all been wondering what happened to Harrison, his brother William and their friend James Thompson since Part 1 last week.

Thompson decided to plead not guilty and a report of his trial is in the Kendal Mercury of Saturday 23 October 1841.

To cut a long story short William Musgrove was called as a witness. He stated:-

“When I went away, Thompson was standing at the window, and that was the last I saw of him. What happened after that I did not see. I positively swear that when I went home, I left Thompson standing at the window. I was not to have part of the ginger bread. I knew where they were going. I was watching for nothing. When I was watching, I knew they were going to steal. If they had got anything, I was not to have any. I went from the bottom of Hallow Lane to the other side of the street. I don’t know my brother will get off easier if Thompson is brought in. I know he will get easier off if Thompson is to blame.”

The jury were instructed to consider how reliable William Musgrove’s evidence was. Perhaps he was trying to put more blame on Thompson when actually it was he and Harrison who were the real culprits.

In the end the jury found Thompson not guilty.

Harrison pleaded guilty – after all he was caught red handed by Mr Court with “three biscuits under his coat, and ginger bread and sugar in his hand”.

The report of Harrison’s conviction is in the Kendal Mercury of Saturday 30 October 1841. The transcript is as follows:-

Harrison Musgrove, who pleaded guilty of stealing from the shop of Mr Court, confectioner, Kendal, was sentenced to three days imprisonment, and to be, during that time, once privately whipped. The court remarked that he appeared to be Kendal Mercury Oct 1841only nine years of age, and that he had commenced a course which, if persevered in, would send him out of the country. It was lamentable to see so young a boy begin an evil course, and it was very questionable whether his parents had done their duty in bringing him up as they ought.

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Gawthrop & John James Pilkington

Ellen Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  She married John James Pilkington on 27 September 1900 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Sabden, Lancashire.

I recently found this report of the wedding in the Burnley Express and couldn’t resist sharing it.  I can’t believe that the report actually includes what appears to be a full list of all the presents!!!

Certainly the happy couple were not going to be short of the odd silver tea spoon.  And perhaps Mr. & Mrs. Bamber were a bit embarrassed by their gift and felt the need to describe the size – a “massive flower stand”.

Ellen Gawthrop wedding 1900

Interesting Wedding – At two o’clock on Thursday afternoon, the Wesleyan Chapel at Sabden, was the scene of a wedding, the bride being Miss Ellen Gawthrop, Sabden, the third daughter of Mr. Israel Gawthrop, the esteemed manager of the  firm of Messrs. James Stuttard and Sons, Sabden, and the bridegroom, Mr. John James Pilkington, of Blackburn, but formerly of Sabden, and son of the late Mr. John Pilkington, Sabden.  Unusual interest was evinced in the wedding by the villagers, and the interesting ceremony, which was performed by the Rev. J. H. Wilkinson, Wesleyan minister, of Padiham, was witnessed by a very large company of friends.  The interior of the chapel had been decorated with choice flowers, etc., and the ceremony was altogether an imposing one.  The bride, who was given away by her father, Mr. Israel Gawthrop, looked exceedingly charming in a rich dress of white alpaca, trimmed with lace, with hat to match.  She was attended by Miss Annie Gawthrop and Miss Bertha Gawthrop, sisters, who were attired in dresses of heliotrope, with grey felt hats, and Miss May Jackson, Padiham, and Miss Clarris Entwistle (nieces), who wore dresses of cream alpaca, with whitehats and shoes to match.  Mr. Frank Entwistle, brother-in-law to the bridegroom, acted as best man.  After the ceremony the wedding party, to the number of about 50, had a drive to Higher Hodder Bridge, where they were entertained to a sumptuous repast.  Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington left in the afternoon, amidst the heartiest good wishes of all, for Scarborough, where they intend to spend the honeymoon.

The following is the list of presents:- Mr. and Mrs. Gawthrop, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. I Gawthrop, dinner service; Mr. and Mrs. Jackson (Padiham), eider down quilt; Mr. and Mrs. Haworth, two door mats; Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson, silver spirit kettle; Mr. and Mrs. Entwistle, toilet set; Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington, silver coffee pot and cruet; Miss A. Gawthrop and Mr. T. L. Anderton, marble timepiece; Miss B. Gawthrop and Mr. R. Anderton, tea service; Miss Gregson, silver salts in case; Miss Birtwistle and Mr. Dixon (Padiham), one dozen silver tea spoons, Miss Webster, silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Ayrey, oak barometer; Miss Whittles, bedroom slippers and salts; Mrs. Bailey, cushion; Miss Foulds and Miss Birtwell, silk head-rest and tea cosy; Miss McLachlan, hall brushes with mirror; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ingham (Blackburn), half a dozen silver desert spoons and forks; Miss Mary and Master Harry Jackson (Padiham), cheese dish and pickle jar; Mr. and Mrs. Stuttard (Read Hall), travelling clock and cheque; Miss Haworth, one dozen silver tea spoons; Miss Brotherton, brass paper rack; Miss Nuttall, plaques; Mrs. Duerden, set of jugs; Mrs. Fish, one dozen silver tea spoons in case; Mr. and Mrs. Hopkinson, cheque; Mrs. Townsend (Manchester), silver cake basket; Miss Burton, silver cruet and jam spoons; Miss Bradshaw, d’oyleys; Mr. Burton (Fence), timepiece; Mr. and Mrs. Kay (Darwen), mirror in brass frame; Mr. Harry Pilkington (America), silver sugar sifter; Mr. and Mrs. E. Standing, brass photo frame; Mr. and Mrs. H. Barnes (Darwen), picture; Mrs. Harwood (Darwen), silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Bamber, massive flower stand; Miss Whittaker, fruit dish; Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw (Southport), half a dozen silver tea spoons and tray cloth; Miss Anderton; trinket set; Miss Standing, brass stand; Mr. Rigby (Swinton), half a dozen tea, desert, and table spoons; Miss Gawthrop, drawing-room chair; the Misses Rowland (Blackpool), Dresden vase and afternoon tray cloth; Mrs. Foulds, plaques; Mrs. Roberts, bread-board, knife, etc.

Black Sheep Sunday – Harrison Musgrove (Part 1)

I have recently started using the British Newspaper archive on Find My Past. I decided to begin with my ancestors from Kendal and surrounding areas as I have some family names that might be fairly easy to trace if they appear in the local papers.

As I suspected I found some stories pretty quickly.

In fact my 2x great grandfather, Harrison Musgrove, appears several times during a period of over twenty years.

So for my first foray into “black sheep’ territory I have decided to serialise Harrison Musgrove’s exploits over the next few weeks.

The first story comes from the Kendal Mercury on Saturday 11 September 1841 and is transcribed below:-

Police Office, Wednesday – (Before John Wakefield, Esquire). – Three boys, named Harrison Musgrove, William Musgrove, and James Thompson, were placed at the Bar by PC’s Hodgson and Brunskill, charged with stealing from the shop of Mr Court, confectioner, Highgate, a quantity of biscuits, loaf sugar, etc. It appeared that Thompson, who is the eldest, opened the shop door and let in Harrison Musgrove, who was without shoes, whilst he himself watched through the window ready to sound a retreat should Mr Court come into the shop, and William Musgrove waited on the other side of the street to give the signal should any policeman make his appearance. Unluckily for the young thieves Mr Court stepped into the shop and caught Harrison behind the counter; the others fled, but were subsequently taken. Harrison Musgrove and Thompson were committed for trial at the sessions, and William Musgrove admitted as evidence.

Well it seems to me that poor Harrison was badly let down here on three counts.

  • Firstly – James Thompson didn’t do a very good job as a “look out” and failed to sound  the retreat quickly enough.
  • Secondly – the other two accomplices scarpered at the first sign of trouble.
  • Thirdly – his brother William (about six years older) is going to give evidence as a witness.

Next week – a report of the trial. Guilty or not guilty – punishment or no punishment. You’ll just have to wait and see.

Kendal Mercury Sep 1841

Military Monday – Walter Dawson (1883-1942)

Walter Dawson is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. I recently discovered him and his military record as a result of a contact through my blog with a newly found relative in New Zealand.

Walter was born in 1883 to parents Joseph Dawson and Alice Hartley in Marsden, Lancashire. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson – my 4x great grandparents.

On 9 December 1898 Walter emigrated with his aunt and uncle, Alice Dodgeon (nee Dawson) and Frederick William Dodgeon. They were heading for Sydney, Australia. At some point after arriving in Australia they all moved to New Zealand.

According to the military records Walter enlisted in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force on 19 June 1917 for the duration of the war. His service reckons from 26 July 1917 and he was finally discharged on 18 June 1819 having spent a total of 1 year and 328 days in service and reaching the rank of lance corporal. Walter’s regimental number was 3/3732.

At the time he enlisted he was living with his aunt and uncle at 34 Coyle Street, Mount Albert, Auckland, New Zealand. His occupation was a clerk.

Walter served with the New Zealand Medical Corps and spent the first part of his service (118 days) in New Zealand. He was then posted overseas on 21 November 1917. He disembarked in Liverpool, England on 8 January 1918.

He was appointed lance corporal on 15 August 1918.

Walter returned to New Zealand after the war and married May Parslow in 1925. As far as I know they had one son – Peter. Following Walter’s death in 1942 I think May and Peter  came to live in the UK.

fileStream-3 (dragged)

Christmas Eve Weddings

Happy Christmas 2012 to all my blog followers and readers.

I thought I would just have a look and see what family events have taken place on Christmas Eve in the past.  I discovered at least three weddings within a seven year period between 1859 and 1866.

Benjamin Gawthrop & Elizabeth Eastwood

Benjamin is my 2nd great grand uncle and he married Elizabeth Eastwood in 1859. According to the record in Ancestry they were both 21 years old. The marriage is registered in Colne, Lancashire. The grooms father was Martin Gawthrop (my 3x great grandfather) and the brides father was Richard Eastwood.

Benjamin and Ann had at least two children – Ann and Benjamin.

Ellen Carradice & Robert Brockbank

Ellen is my 2nd great grand aunt and she married Robert Brockbank in 1864. According to the marriage certificate they were both 24 years old. The marriage took place at Kendal parish church in Westmorland. The grooms father was Samuel Brockbank – a woollen spinner and the brides father was John Carradice (my 3x great grandfather) who was a weaver.

Image

Margaret Dawson & Abel Ellison

Margaret is my 2nd great grand aunt and she married Abel Ellison in 1866. Abel was about 28 years old and Margaret one year younger. The marriage took place at St. Andrew’s church in Kildwick, West Yorkshire. The brides father was Thomas Dawson (my 3x great grandfather).

What a magical time to be getting married. I hope they all had wonderful celebrations.

Sunday’s Obituary – Benjamin Gawthrop

I have written about my cousin, Benjamin Gawthrop, twice already, here and here.

Since then I have been lucky to make contact with one of Benjamin’s grandchildren and she very kindly send me the photograph and the article below from The Australian Baptist, 3 July 1928.

Death of Rev. B Gawthrop

“ Christian Gentleman”

Tributes to his life and ministry

After a protracted illness, Rev. Benjamin Gawthrop, A.T.S., passed into the Eternal Presence late on Saturday night last at a private hospital in Randwick (Sydney). Though his death, judged from the nature of his illness, seemed imminent, the end came more suddenly than was expected. Within twenty-four hours of his passing, all the members of his family had been with him, but none of them thought he was so near life’s close. Happily, those closing hours brought consciousness and Mr. Gawthrop was able to enjoy his last fellowship with those dearest to him

In his death the Baptist denomination in New South Wales has lost one of its ablest, wisest and most gifted ministers, and his passing leaves another gap in the fast thinning ranks of our senior ministers.

It is twenty years since Mr. Gawthrop came to Australia, and up to the time that his health began to fail, he occupied a commanding place in our ministry, and exerted wide and beneficient influence. He was one of our Greathearts, radiating sunshine and goodwill wherever he went and in whatever he did.

Mr. Gawthrop was a native of Colne, Lancashire, England. Had he lived till August he would have reached his  59th milestone on life’s journey. Educated at Rawdon College, where he gained his A.T.S. degree, he entered upon his first pastorate as minister of the church at Heaton (Newcastle-on-Tyne).

After a ministry there extending over 14 years, the call came to succeed the late Rev. Dr. Thomas Porter at Petersham, and 1908 Mr. Gawthrop made his great adventure and followed the gleam which led him to Australia. His fruitful ministry at Petersham continued for ten years, and one of the happiest features of the funeral service conducted in the church previous to the interment at Rookwood was the presence of quite a number of young men who had grown up in his Bible-class, and came to pay their last tribute to his memory and his influence.

From Petersham, Mr. Gawthrop went to Katoomba, and later to Newcastle, where he was minister of the Tabernacle for four years, with conspicuous success. In both these spheres of service his memory will long remain as a sweet savour. From Newcastle Mr. Gawthrop returned to Katoomba, but as an invalid. It was hoped that the mountain air and a subsequent visit to England, would cure him an his malady. But it was not to be, and soon after his return to the lowlands his friends realised that his days of active service were over.

Mr. Gawrhrop is survived by his widow, his only daughter (Mrs. Horace Simpson) and three sons (Mr. Clifford Gawthrop, Mr. Martin Gawthrop, and Master Jack Gawthrop).

Armistice Day 2012

Today I especially want to remember the following people from my family tree who gave their lives fighting in two World Wars in the last century:-

Ernest Aldersley (1899 – 1918)

Philip Melville Cardell (1917 – 1940)

Prince Dawson (1893 – 1915)

Frederick Espley (1881 – 1916)

George Hurtley (1891 – 1918)

Arthur Lockington (1892 – 1915)

Thomas Musgrove (c1894 – 1918)

Allen Simpson (1923 – 1943)

Frederick Ellis Spink DFC (1921 – 1944)

Also the following family members who all signed up for service in the Great War of 1914 – 1918:-

Hugh Buckley (c1888 – ) Herbert Carradice (1896 – 1935)
Thomas Carradice (c1884 – ) Arthur Dawson (1879 – 1944)
Clifford Dawson (1900 – 1953) Harry Dawson (1895 – 1954)
John Dawson (c1890 – ) Watson Emmott Dawson (1887 – 1944)
William Dawson (1880 – 1939) Jim Hurtley (1887 – 1947)
Tom Hurtley (1897 – 1977) Harry Musgrove (1889 – 1974)
James Musgrove (1894 – 1925) Tom Musgrove (1898 – 1969)
Thomas William Paley (1892 – 1943)

I have written about each of these brave men and you can find their stories in the Military Monday category of my blog.

Summer recess is over

Hello – I’ve taken a break from blogging over the summer.

It has allowed me time to do some research for other people which I really enjoy. Also me and Mrs D have taken up “hiking” or really just strolling gently on a Sunday around our lovely Yorkshire countryside – this has stopped me becoming almost permanently attached to my computer.

I now need to re-connect with some relatives who have contacted me through my blog over the last year. I discovered new relatives in Yorkshire and in Australia.

Anyway please look out for new posts coming soon and thanks for taking time to read my blog and for your comments.

Sunday Snap – Cononley Gala

This is a photograph taken probably sometime in the 1950’s or 1960’s I think. The woman in the long “short’ pants is my great aunt Jessie Brown (nee Hurtley).

I can’t be sure but I believe the picture was probably taken at the time of the Cononley Gala. They are carrying collecting tins and are no doubt intent on fleecing gala visitors of their hard earned cash!!!

Cononley is a small village in Airedale, Yorkshire about three miles south of Skipton. The village is an important place in my family history. During his childhood my dad spent many happy times here staying with his aunts and uncles.

Here is a link to the Cononley Village Website. The 2012 village gala was held yesterday and you can see photographs from last year on the website.

Tombstone Tuesday – Thomas and Alice Thompson

This gravestone is at Holy Trinity church in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

Buried here are Thomas Thompson, his wife Alice (nee Dawson) and their daughter Mary Ellen.

Alice Dawson is my 2nd cousin 3x removed – our common ancestors are my 4x great grandparents John Dawson and Ann Watson. She was born on 18 November 1848 to parents James Wright Dawson and Mary Thompson.

Alice married Thomas Thompson sometime in Q4 of 1870. They had at least five children:-

• Mary Ellen – c1872

• James – c1880

• Sarah Lizzie – c1884

• William – c1886

• John David – c1888

Thomas worked as a warp dresser most of his life.

Alice passed away on 9 October 1926 at the age of 77. Thomas survived for almost another nine years until he died at the age of 85 on 8 May 1935. Their daughter Mary Ellen didn’t marry and she passed away on 12 November 1959 aged 88.