Military Monday – John Bentley Hurtley (1885-1917)

John Bentley Hurtley is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are Robert Bentley Hurtley and Louisa Ann Naylor. Our common ancestors are Thomas Hurtley and Hannah Braidley, my 3x great grandparents.

John was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire in 1885. His birth is registered in Q3.

In the 1911 census John was a boarder at an address in Kirkstall, Leeds. He was following in his father’s footsteps and working as a “butchers assistant”.

I haven’t been able to find any remaining military records on http://www.ancestry.co.uk or http://www.findmypast.co.uk. I have found a record of John on the Commonwealth War Graves Commissions website http://www.cwgc.org and also on http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk.

So I know that John was a Private in the West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own) and served in the 9th Battalion. His service number was 37170.

John died of wounds on 22 November 1917 while fighting in France.

He is buried at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.

The following information is taken from the CWGC website.

St Sever Cemetery and St. Sever Cemetery Extension are located within a large communal cemetery situated on the eastern edge of the southern Rouen suburbs of Le Grand Quevilly and Le Petit Quevilly.

During the First World War, Commonwealth camps and hospitals were stationed on the southern outskirts of Rouen. A base supply depot and the 3rd Echelon of General Headquarters were also established in the city.

Almost all of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for practically the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross and one labour hospital, and No. 2 Convalescent Depot. A number of the dead from these hospitals were buried in other cemeteries, but the great majority were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension, where the last burial took place in April 1920.

During the Second World War, Rouen was again a hospital centre and the extension was used once more for the burial of Commonwealth servicemen, many of whom died as prisoners of war during the German occupation.

The cemetery extension contains 8,348 Commonwealth burials of the First World War (ten of them unidentified) and in Block “S” there are 328 from the Second World War (18 of them unidentified). There are also 8 Foreign National burials here.

The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

St. Sever Cemetery Extension

St. Sever Cemetery Extension

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