Month: January 2012

Military Monday – Thomas Carradice

Thomas Carradice is my 2nd cousin 2x removed.  Our common ancestors are my 3x great parents, John Carradice and Ann Ridley.

Thomas was born in Kendal, Westmorland – his birth is registered in the June quarter of 1884.

By the time of the 1901 census Thomas was living in Bradford, West Yorkshire with his father John Carradice and step-mother Sarah Jane Lightowler.  His mother Mary having died in 1892.  Thomas was working as a ‘wool comb minder’.

He enlisted in the West Yorkshire Regiment on 12 June 1903 – his service number is 7095.  He is described as 5 feet 6 inches in height and weighing 115lbs.  His religion is given as Church of England.

The next piece of information I have is a note dated 13 November 1903 that Thomas appears to have been charged with fraudulently enlisting in the ‘R I Regiment’.  He was tried and convicted and sentenced to 6 months imprisonment with hard labour.  He was then to be discharged with ‘ignominy’ – see extract below.

I have not been able to find any other details about this.

I found Thomas in the 1911 census still living in Bradford and working as a ‘moulders labourer’.  I haven’t done any more research on him except to identify a potential death record in the September quarter of 1921 in the North Bierley registration district of West Yorkshire.

Sports Centre Saturday – Ernest Dawson

Ernest Dawson is my 3rd cousin 2x removed.  He was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire on 26 February 1896.  Ernest is my only Dawson ancestor I have found so far with a connection to sports activity.

This is a photograph of the Cowling Football Team from 1912-13 and reproduced with permission of Cowling Web.  As far as I can tell Ernest is the young man on the left of the middle row.

© / Credited To: Norman R Binns. Scanned by: Moonrakers

Back Row L-R: Maurice Laycock, Laurie Hardy, Arthur Binns

Middle Row L-R: Ernest Dawson, Thomas Percy Smith, Albert Dale

Front Row L-R: Harry Wilkinson, Richard Fort, Willie Hewitt, George Thorp, George Robinson

Team football in Cowling began in 1910 when Cowling United was formed.  The team first played at Hallam Hill, then on top of Earl’s Crag and Knowle Hill before moving to their present ground on Keighley Road.

There was a break in playing during the First World War.  The team then reformed in 1918 in the Craven League.

One legendary story from those early days suggests that the team had a very unusual cup double – playing and winning two cup finals on the same day.

In 1920 young lads who couldn’t get a game formed another team Cowling Swifts.  They first played on the recreation ground and then on the present pitch.  The Swift players became the nucleus of the good Cowling sides of the 1920’s and 1930’s.

The club is still going strong after more than 100 years.

Horton in Ribblesdale – Postcard #14

This is a postcard from my own collection.  It is a real photograph published by Joanes Publications, Broomhouse, George Nympton, South Molton, Devon.

The postcard is unused and in very good condition.

The image is of steam engine number 45522 ‘Prestatyn’ with a train from Carlisle at Horton in Ribblesdale station and is dated 27 July 1962.

If you’re a regular reader of my blog you might remember that Horton in Ribblesdale is an important location in my ancestry.  This is where my nannie, Florrie Musgrove, was born in 1897 – here’s a recent post about Foredale Cottages where she lived.

Horton in Ribblesdale railway station was built in 1876 during the construction of the 73 mile long stretch of line between Settle and Carlisle by the Midland Railway Company.  The line runs through remote regions of the Yorkshire Dales and the North Pennines, and is considered to be the most scenic railway in England.  The drama of its history and construction mean that it is regarded as one of the culminating symbols of Victorian enterprise and engineering.

All the station buildings along the route were designed by Midland Railway Company architect John Holloway Sanders.  The general design was known as Derby (or Midland) Gothic because the company was based in Derby.

There were three sizes of buildings in all, reflecting the relative importance of the station stops.  Horton in Ribblesdale was a Type C station.

In 1963, Beeching Report into the restructuring of British Rail recommended the withdrawal of all passenger services from the line.  Some smaller stations had closed in the 1950s.  The Beeching recommendations were shelved, but in May 1970 all stations except for Settle and Appleby were closed.

Over the next two decades the Settle – Carlisle line faced the threat of closure by British Rail as passenger number reduced and the cost of repairing viaducts and abandoned station buildings grew.  A very public campaign against the closure was eventually successful and the Government finally refused consent to close the line in 1989.

Meanwhile refurbishment work had already begun at Horton in Ribblesdale station and it was reopened in 1986.

There is one other family connection with this post.  The Midland Railway Company was merged into the London Midland & Scottish Railway, with the LNWR also forming part of the new company.  My granddad, Joseph Dawson, worked for LM&S, first as a fireman then a driver.  He’s the one in the photograph with a x on his arm.

Grandad Joe and his work mates

Military Monday – Herbert Carradice (1896-1935)

Herbert Mark Carradice is my 1st cousin 3x removed – our common ancestors are my 3x great grandparents John Carradice and Ann Ridley.  Herbert was born in Kendal, Westmorland, to parents Alexander Carradice and Adela Ormandy Birkhead.  His birth is registered in the December quarter of 1895.

I have been lucky enough to find his WW1 service records on www.ancestry.co.uk so I know that Herbert enlisted on 3 October 1916 at Carlisle, Cumberland.  His regimental service number is 242249 (or 4360) and he was assigned to the 4th Border Regiment.  His age is given as 20 years 10 months and his occupation is ‘tailor’.

Herbert’s ‘military history sheet’ shows that he was at home from 3 October 1916 to 14 January 1917.  He embarked for Boulogne on 15 January 1917.

The next piece of information shows that Herbert was wounded in action on 3 July 1917 and was moved to Etaples Military Hospital.  He presumably recovered well enough from his injuries and rejoined his battalion on 2 September 1917.

As Christmas approached Herbert was granted leave from 24 December 1917 to 7 January 1918.

MISSING is stamped on his record on 10 April 1918.  Underneath that is a note dated 6 November 1918 that Herbert is a ‘prisoner of war’ but the location is unclear’.  Another document in his records shows that Herbert was captured on 21 March 1918 and interred in the town of Roisel.

On 10 December 1918 Herbert’s service record shows that he arrived back in England as a ‘repatriated prisoner of war’.

During Herbert’s time as a ‘prisoner of war’ his father, Alexander, was clearly anxious about his son.  On 14 April 1918, having not heard from Herbert for over a month Alexander wrote to the army asking for information.

On 18 May 1918 Alexander wrote again to the army sending on to them a postcard he had received from Herbert in Germany.  It seems that the army had asked Alexander to let them know if he had any contact from Herbert ‘so that his pay will not stop’.  Akexander asked for the postcard to be returned to him – I wonder if t ever was.

Alexander subsequently had a letter from Herbert and wrote to the Army Pay Office on 15 July 1918 asking if he was allowed to send a parcel to Herbert.

Herbert was finally ‘demobbed’ on 26 Novemeber 1919.  However, like many of his comrades he was retained in the Class Z Reserve.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918.  There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities.  Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z.  They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon.  The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Herbert married Hilda Marshall in Kendal, Westmorland sometime in the September quarter of 1927.  They had two children – Audrey in 1928 and Edwin in 1929.

Herbert died in 1935 – he was only 39.

Ancestor Profile – Benjamin Gawthrop (1869-1928)

Benjamin Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  Our common ancestors are my 3x great grandparents Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley.  Benjamin is the son of Benjamin Gawthrop and Elizabeth Eastwood.  He is also the cousin of John Gawthrop who I have written about here and here.

Benjamin was born on 10 August 1869 at Trawden in Lancashire.  I have found him on the census returns for 1871, 1881, 1891 and 1901.

In 1891 Benjamin is living at 3 Heath Street, Burnley, Lancashire and is described as a ‘theological student’.  By 1901 he is a ‘Baptist Minister” and living at 91 Cardigan Terrace, Heaton, Newcastle Upon Tyne.

Benjamin married Jane Hargreaves in Burnley sometime in Q2 1895.  They had four children

• Helen May – b. 1896

• Benjamin Clifford – b. 1899

• Annie – b. 1900 (and died as a baby)

• Robert Martin – b. 1908

On 16 April 1908 Benjamin, Jane and their three children left England.  They sailed from London on the SS Orontes bound for Sydney, Australia.

Sadly Jane died after only six years in Australia.

Benjamin later married Constance Lillian Butler on 7 November 1916 in Randwick, New South Wales, Australia.  At some point around 1918 Benjamin and Constance returned to England but I have not been able to establish exactly when this was.  They had one son – John Richard – born 1920 in Sabden (near Burnley), Lancashire.

All three of them went back to Australia on 23 June 1927 sailing from London on the SS Barrabool to Sydney.  Here’s the extract from the ship’s passenger list.

It was in Australia that Benjamin had much influence and made a big impact in the communities he served.

The Baptist Theological College of New South Wales was established in 1916 and Benjamin was a founding member of the faculty when the college opened.  Here’s a link to The Baptist Recorder from July 2006 commemorating the 90th anniversary of the college’s opening.  There is a brief biography about Benjamin which reads as follows:-

Gawthrop was a scholarly fellow and became the College’s first lecturer in Church History.

He came from Heaton Road church at Newcastle Upon Tyne, England, where he had been the minister from 1894.  When he arrived there the membership was 60 and when he left 14 years later the number had risen to 388.  It had been his first and only English church to that time.  Born at Colne, Lancashire, and educated at Rawdon College.

He came to Australia to take the pulpit of the Petersham Church where he began in June 1908 and remained until April 1918 when he returned to England.  He was a strong church man and wrote and preached regularly on the importance of the church, which he firmly believed was  the direct creation of Christ.  He considered that being a Christian meant being a member of the church.  Strongly evangelical, he shared Waldock’s conviction that being called to be a preacher of the Gospel was the highest honour Christ could bestow on any man.

Both Benjamin and John Gawthrop seem to have done great work in their respective faiths.  I am proud to have them as ancestors.

Surname Saturday – Cowgill

The surname Cowgill appears in my tree thirteen times at the moment.  None of the people are in my direct line of ancestors.  They are wives, husbands or in-laws of cousins – so not close.

According to surnamedb the name has two possible derivations.

The first is from the early Medieval English or Olde French ‘cokille’ which means ‘a shell’ or ‘cockle’.  It is suggested that this surname may have been applied to pilgrims to the Shrine of St. James of Compostella who sewed shells on their clothes as a sign of pilgrimage.  A cockle-hat (with a shell stuck on it) was also worn as a sign of pilgrimage.  Here’s an article called the Way of St. James in Wikipedia – so make up your own mind.

The second possibility is that Cockle is a locational name (from Cockhill) from a place of the same name in the West Riding of Yorkshire.  The name having been corrupted to Cowgill or Cockell in some directories.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas Cockel, which was dated 1198 in the Pipe Rolls of Northampton.

Alternatively information can be found on the Internet suggesting that the name also has origins in Scotland.

A family in the Pictish tribe of ancient Scotland is said to be the first to use the name Cowgill.  They lived in the lands of Cargill in east Perthshire where the family at one time had extensive territories.

In medieval Scotland names were more often spelled according to sound than any regular set of rules.  So over the years Cowgill has been spelled as Cargill, Cargyle and Kergylle amongst others.

Some noteable Cowgill’s include:-

Bryan Cowgill (1927-2008) – BBC television executive and pioneer behind Grandstand and Match of The Day

George L Cowgill (b1929) – American anthropologist and archaeologist

Collin Brannen Cowgill (b1986) – American professional baseball player