Month: November 2010

Military Monday – Thomas Musgrove

Thomas Musgrove was born c1894 in Horton in Ribblesdale, Yorkshire (England). He was the second son of my great grandparents Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Musgrove (nee Turner). That makes Thomas my grand uncle.

Thomas served as a private in the 9th battalion of The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. His service number was 29629.

He was killed in action on 7 April 1918 in Belgium.

Thomas is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium.

Ploegsteert Memorial

The Ploegsteet Memorial commemorates more than 11,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in this sector during the First World War and have no known grave. Those commemorated by the memorial did not die in major offensives, such as those which took place around Ypres or Loos. Most were killed in the course of day-to-day trench warfare, or in small scale set engagements, usually carried out in support of the major attacks taking place elsewhere. (information from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website)

One-Name Study Update #1

I started work on my “Espley One-Name Study” on 29 October.

I don’t know if other people keep manuscript notes but it certainly works for me. So I have today finished transcribing the GRO births for 1837-1915 in to a new reference book I started just for this project.

My next step is to tackle the birth records on the IGI.

I have also registered a website domain name for when I am ready to publish the results of my study.

Things still to to do

  • join The Guild of One-Name Studies and register the Espley name with them
  • more research about computer software options
  • prepare a plan for when I finish recording the IGI births
  • continuing research on the Espley name – locations, historical facts etc.

I will be doing other family history tasks as well – so the “one-name study” will take a back seat from time to time.

This last week I have also been indexing census and draft records for Family Search. So it seems as though I have spent every spare minute in front of the lap top.

May be time for an IT break – then again may be not!

Surname Saturday – Carradice

The name Carradice is on my mother’s side of the family. The earliest ancestor with the name I have found is my is 3x great grandfather John Carradice. He was born in Kendal, Westmorland (United Kingdom) about 1807. There are potential candidates for his father in the records but I haven’t yet been able to determine the right person. This is a work in progress.

 According to surnamedb Carradice is an interesting and unusual name of Medieval Scottish origin. It is said to be a phonetic variant of the locational name Carruthers. This apparently comes from the parish of Middlebie, Dumfriesshire and pronounced in local speech as “Cridders”.

 Modern variants include – Crothers, Carrodus, Cardis, Cruddace and Caruth.

I rather like our family folklore interpretation which suggests that the name is of Italian origin and should be pronounced “Carradeechie”

Anyway, my John Carradice married Ann Ridley in Kendal on 2nd February 1829. They had at least 13 children. Their youngest child, Mary Jane is my 2x great grandmother. She was born 8th November 1854 – it’s her birthday in a couple of days, must remember to raise a glass in celebration. Mary Jane married Thomas Turner on 29th June 1872 at the Register Office in Kendal and she died on 18th April 1917 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I do not have any photographs of any of my Carradice ancestors but keep searching the Internet in the forlorn hope that one might turn up from a long lost relative somewhere.

Wedding Wednesday – Wartime Hitch

My Parents married on 4th January 1941 at St James Church in Grimsby Lincolnshire. Grimsby was my mother’s home town but at some point she moved about 30 miles away to Sutton-on-Sea on the Lincolnshire coast to help my dad run a little glass and china business. My brother married in the same church 30 years later because, coincidentally, he married a Grimsby girl.
  
 
Both my parents had unusual surnames. Mum was a Britliffe – more commonly spelt with a ’c’ as in Britcliffe and Dad’s name was Espley. They also both had shortened versions of first names – Dad was Fred rather than Fredrick and mum was Bessie which is usually given to girls christened as Elizabeth.  
 

I’m not sure how my parents met. Both are now dead so I can’t ask. My Dad died in 1977 before I took any interest in their history and I never had the sort of relationship with my mum that lead to any discussion about ‘the old days’. In her later years when Mike started to research our family history she had great difficulty understanding why we would want to do such a thing.

Anyway I think my father must have been stationed in Grimsby during the war. He had a bout of polio when he was small and was deaf in one ear so wasn’t sent overseas. Certainly at some point dad was moved to Pontefract, West Yorkshire, because I know mum visited him at the barracks there. I am not sure if this was before or after the wedding.

Dad was nine years older than mum. Her dad was suspicious of this and told her that Fred was probably already married with kids. Mum disliked her dad and he didn’t attend the wedding. I am not sure whether he was working, he simply chose not to go or mum asked him not to attend.

My Uncle Jack – Mum’s brother- second from the right in the photo, gave her away. Dad’s Best Man was his brother Frank. The smallest two Bridesmaids are my cousins Shirley and Tessa but I don’t know the identities of anyone else in the photo.

The dresses were all made of velvet which must have been fabulous for a winter wedding. I am not sure how they got hold of all this fabric during the war. I believe the small Bridesmaids were in lilac and perhaps, therefore, the grown up attendants were in purple. The two colours would seem to go together.

The other thing I know is that mum had asked dad to buy a suit as she didn’t want him to get married in his army uniform. Obviously he ignored her! Luckily it didn’t make her change her mind and they were happily married for 36 years.

Jayne